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Prolonged Grief Among Traumatically Bereaved Relatives Exposed and Not Exposed to a Tsunami
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry.
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2011 (English)In: Journal of Traumatic Stress, ISSN 0894-9867, E-ISSN 1573-6598, Vol. 24, no 4, 456-464 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Numerous studies on the mental health consequences of traumatic exposure to a disaster compare those exposed to those not exposed. Relatively few focus on the effect of the death of a close relative caused by the disaster-suffering a traumatic bereavement. This study compared the impact on 345 participants who lost a close relative in the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, but who were themselves not present, to 141 who not only lost a relative, but also were themselves exposed to the tsunami. The focus was on psychological distress assessed during the second year after the sudden bereavement. Findings were that exposure to the tsunami was associated with prolonged grief (B = 3.81) and posttraumatic stress reactions (B 665), and doubled the risk for impaired mental health. Loss of children increased the risk for psychological distress (prolonged grief B = 692; The Impact of Event Scale-Revised: B = 610; General Health Questionnaire-12: OR = 2.34). Women had a higher frequency of prolonged grief For men, loss of children presented a higher risk for prolonged grief in relation to other types of bereavement (B = 636 vs. loss of partner). Further long-term follow-up could deepen the understanding of how recovery after traumatic loss is facilitated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 24, no 4, 456-464 p.
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Psychiatry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-159261DOI: 10.1002/jts.20668ISI: 000294575800012OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-159261DiVA: diva2:443473
Available from: 2011-09-26 Created: 2011-09-26 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Bergh Johannesson, KerstinLundin, TomMichel, Per-Olof

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