uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Environmental correlates of diet in the swordtail characin (Corynopoma riisei, gill)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal Ecology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5791-336X
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal Ecology.
2011 (English)In: Environmental Biology of Fishes, ISSN 0378-1909, E-ISSN 1573-5133, Vol. 92, no 2, 159-166 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the sexually dimorphic swordtail characin (Corynopoma riisei, Gill), males are equipped with an opercular flag-ornament that has been suggested to function as a food-mimic since females bite at the ornament during courtship. However, virtually nothing is known about the diet in wild populations of this species. In this study, we first investigated composition of and variation in the diet of C. riisei across 18 different populations in Trinidad, using gut content analyses. We then related variation in gut content to habitat features of populations to investigate the potential link between environmental conditions and prey utilization. Our results showed that the dominating food type in the gut was various terrestrial invertebrates, both adults and larvae, but we also document substantial variation in prey types across populations. Furthermore, a canonical correlation analysis revealed a relationship between environmental characteristics and diet: populations from wider and more rapidly flowing streams with more canopy cover tended to have a diet based more on ants and mosquitoes while populations from narrow and slow flowing streams with little canopy cover tended to have a diet based more on springtails, mites and mayfly larvae. Our results add novel information on the ecology of this interesting fish and suggest the possibility of local adaptation reflecting differences in prey availability across natural populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 92, no 2, 159-166 p.
Keyword [en]
Sexual dimorphism, Gut content, Sensory exploitation, Sensory drive, Local adaptation, Habitat
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-159215DOI: 10.1007/s10641-011-9825-zISI: 000294564000003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-159215DiVA: diva2:444145
Available from: 2011-09-28 Created: 2011-09-26 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Kolm, NiclasArnqvist, Göran

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kolm, NiclasArnqvist, Göran
By organisation
Animal Ecology
In the same journal
Environmental Biology of Fishes
Biological Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 404 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf