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Increased perinatal intracranial pressure and brainstem dysfunction predict early puberty in boys with myelomeningocele
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Barnendokrinologisk forskning/Gustafsson)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Barnendokrinologisk forskning/Gustafsson)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Barnneurologisk forskning/Ahlsten)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Barnendokrinologisk forskning/Gustafsson)
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2011 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 100, no 10, 1368-1372 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Children with myelomeningocele (MMC) run an increased risk of developing early or precocious puberty (E/PP).

Aim: To identify risk factors for E/PP in boys with MMC.

Methods: Boys born between 1970 and 1992, treated for MMC at the University Children's Hospital, Uppsala, were identified. Thirty-eight boys were eligible to be included. Medical records were examined retrospectively. Early puberty was defined as pubertal signs before the age of 10 years and 2 months. Precocious puberty was defined as the appearance of these signs before 9 years of age. Increased intracranial pressure perinatally was defined as wide sutures, bulging fontanelles and increased/increasing head circumference at birth and/or during the first week after birth. Early brainstem dysfunction was defined as severe and persistent feeding and respiratory problems before the age of 3 months despite proper control of the hydrocephalus.

Results: Of the 38 boys, 8 (21%) had E/PP, which was strongly associated with increased intracranial pressure perinatally and also with early brainstem dysfunction. Multivariate regression analysis showed early brainstem dysfunction to have the highest explanatory value regarding the occurrence of early puberty.

Conclusion: Increased intracranial pressure perinatally and brainstem dysfunction early in life are strong predictors of E/PP in boys with MMC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 100, no 10, 1368-1372 p.
Keyword [en]
Brainstem dysfunction, Early puberty, Intracranial pressure, Myelomeningocele, Perinatal
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-159462DOI: 10.1111/j.1651-2227.2011.02335.xISI: 000294900300030OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-159462DiVA: diva2:445579
Available from: 2011-10-04 Created: 2011-10-03 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Proos, Lemm A.Tuvemo, TorstenAhlsten, GunnarGustafsson, JanDahl, Margareta

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