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An experimental study on effects of increased ventilation flow on students' perception of indoor environment in computer classrooms.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. (Eva Vingård)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
2008 (English)In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 18, no 4, 293-300 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The effects of ventilation in computer classrooms were studied with university students (n = 355) in a blinded study, 31% were women and 3.8% had asthma. Two classrooms had a higher air exchange (4.1-5.2 ac/h), two others had a lower air exchange (2.3-2.6 ac/h). After 1 week, ventilation conditions were shifted. The students reported environmental perceptions during the last hour. Room temperature, RH, CO2, PM10 and ultra-fine particles were measured simultaneously. Mean CO2 was 1185 ppm at lower and 922 ppm at higher air exchange. Mean temperature was 23.2 degrees C at lower and 22.1 degrees C at higher air exchange. After mutual adjustment (temperature, RH, CO2, air exchange), measured temperature was associated with a perception of higher temperature (P < , 0.001), lower air movement (P < , 0.001), and poorer air quality (P < , 0.001). Higher air exchange was associated with a perception of lower temperature (P < , 0.001), higher air movement (P = 0.001), and better air quality (P < , 0.001). In the longitudinal analysis (n = 83), increased air exchange caused a perception of lower temperature (P = 0.002), higher air movement (P < , 0.001), better air quality (P = 0.001), and less odor (P = 0.02). In conclusion, computer classrooms have CO2 levels above 1000 ppm and temperatures above 22 degrees C. Increased ventilation from 7 l/s per person to 10-13 l/s per person can improve thermal comfort and air quality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 18, no 4, 293-300 p.
Keyword [en]
carbon dioxide, indoor air quality, ventilation, room temperature; perceived air quality, computer classrooms, university students
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-17180DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0668.2008.00530.xISI: 000257779200005PubMedID: 18422569OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-17180DiVA: diva2:44951
Available from: 2008-06-17 Created: 2008-06-17 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Norbäck, D

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