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Experiences from pregnancy and childbirth related to female genital mutilation among Eritrean immigrant women in Sweden
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. (Caring Sciences)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
2008 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 24, no 2, 214-225 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: to explore Eritrean immigrant women's experiences of female genital mutilation (FGM) during pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum period. Design: qualitative study using an ethnographic approach. Data were collected via tape-recorded interviews. Setting: interviews in the Eritrean women's homes located in and around Uppsala, Sweden. Participants: 15 voluntary Eritrean immigrant women. Data collection and analysis: Semi-structured interview and open-ended questions were used. The interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim and then analysed. Findings: six themes of experiences of FGM among Eritrean women during pregnancy and childbirth were identified. They are (1) fear and anxiety, (2) extreme pain and tong-term complications, (3) health-care professionals' knowledge of circumcision and health-care system, (4) support from family, relatives and friends, (5) de-infibulation, and (6) decision against female circumcision of daughters. Key conclusion and implications for practice: the Eritrean women had experiences of FGM and had suffered from its complications during pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum period. Midwives and obstetricians should have competence in managing women with FGM, and they need increased understanding of cultural epistemology in order to be able to provide quality care to these women. At antenatal centres, circumcised women should be advised to deinfibulate before pregnancy. Special courses about anatomical differences should be offered to these women and their husbands. It is also important to inform them about Swedish law, which prohibits all forms of FGM.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 24, no 2, 214-225 p.
Keyword [en]
female genital mutilation, Eritrean immigrant women, experiences, pregnancy, childbirth, postpartum period, Sweden
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-17404DOI: 10.1016/j.midw.2006.10.003ISI: 000256692600011PubMedID: 17316934OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-17404DiVA: diva2:45175
Available from: 2008-06-23 Created: 2008-06-23 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Lundberg, Pranee

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