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The scleritome of Eccentrotheca from the Lower Cambrian of South Australia: Lophophorate affinities and implications for tommotiid phylogeny
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
Centre for Ecostratigraphy and Palaeobiology, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Macquarie University, Australia .
Division of Earth Sciences, School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Armidale Australia .
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
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2008 (English)In: Geology, ISSN 0091-7613, E-ISSN 1943-2682, Vol. 36, no 2, 171-174 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The first partially articulated scleritome of a tommotiid, Eccentrotheca sp., is described from the Lower Cambrian of South Australia. The Eccentrotheca scleritome consists of individual sclerites; fused in a spiral arrangement, forming a tapering tube-shaped skeleton with an inclined apical aperture and a circular to subcircular cross section. Traditionally, tommotiid sclerites have been assumed to form a dorsal armor of imbricating phosphatic plates in slug-like bilaterians, analogous to the calcareous sclerites of halkieriids. The structure of the Eceentrotheca scleritome is here reinterpreted as a tube composed of independent, irregularly shaped sclerites growing by basal-marginal accretion that were successively fused to form a rigid, protective tubular structure. The asymmetrical shape and sometimes acute inclination of the apical aperture suggests that the apical part of the scleritome was cemented to a hard surface via a basal disc, from which it projected vertically. Rather than being a vagrant member of the benthos, Eccentrotheca most likely represented a sessile, vermiform filter feeder. The new data suggest that the affinities of Eccentrotheca, and possibly some other problematic tommotiids, lie with the lophophorates (i.e., the phoronids and brachiopods), a clade that also possesses a phosphatic shell chemistry and a sessile life habit.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 36, no 2, 171-174 p.
Keyword [en]
tommotiida, phylogeny, Brachiopoda, Phoronida, Lower Cambrian
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-17769DOI: 10.1130/G24385A.1ISI: 000252829600019OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-17769DiVA: diva2:45540
Available from: 2008-08-26 Created: 2008-08-26 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Skovsted, Christian B.Holmer, Lars E.Budd, Graham E.

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