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Dose-dependent behavioral disturbances after a single neonatal Bisphenol A dose
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
2011 (English)In: Toxicology, ISSN 0300-483X, E-ISSN 1879-3185, Vol. 209, no 2-3, 188-195 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bisphenol A is widely used in polymer products for food and beverage packaging, baby bottles, dental sealants, and fillings, adhesives, protective coatings, flame retardants, water supply pipes, and compact discs, and is found in the environment and in placental tissue, fetuses and breast milk. We have recently reported that neonatal exposure to other environmental pollutants can induce persistent aberrations in spontaneous behavior and also affect learning and memory functions in the adult animal. Furthermore, recent reports indicate that pre- and perinatal exposure to Bisphenol A can induce neurotoxic effects. The present study indicates that a single exposure to Bisphenol A on postnatal day 10 can alter adult spontaneous behavior and cognitive function in mice, effects that are both dose–response related and long-lasting/irreversible. Earlier studies on neonatal exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have shown the cholinergic system to be a target of neurotoxicity, but here only minor effects on the nicotine-induced behavior was seen. Furthermore, Morris swim-maze and the elevated plus-maze did not reveal any effects on spatial learning and anxiety-like behaviors. The present findings show similarities with effects earlier reported after pre- and perinatal exposure to Bisphenol A, and also with effects seen after a single postnatal exposure to other POPs, such as PBDEs, PCBs and PFCs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 209, no 2-3, 188-195 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Ecotoxicology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-161824DOI: 10.1016/j.tox.2011.09.006ISI: 000298534700080OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-161824DiVA: diva2:457553
Available from: 2011-11-18 Created: 2011-11-18 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Viberg, HenrikFredriksson, AndersBuratovic, SonjaEriksson, Per

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