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Child health and maternal stress: does neighbourhood status matter?
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. (Socialpediatrisk forskning)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. (Socialpediatrisk forskning)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. (Socialpediatrisk forskning)
2011 (English)In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 23, no 1, 19-25 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this cross-sectional questionnaire study was to explore neighbourhood-level differences in health behaviour, maternal stress and sense of coherence, birth weight, child health and behaviour, and children's television watching habits. In total, 2006 pairs of Swedish mothers and children, aged approximately 20 months, from the general population participated in the study. A total of 1923 lived in neighbourhoods of average socioeconomic status in six counties, and 83 in a high-status neighbourhood in one of the counties. Data were collected in 2002-2003 and 2004-2005 through the Child Health Services. Socio-demographic confounders were adjusted for in multiple logistic regressions (maternal age, country of birth, education, marital status and parity). Compared with their counterparts in average neighbourhoods, mothers in the high-status neighbourhood were less frequently smokers and had been breastfeeding their children more. They felt less stress from social isolation and had a higher sense of coherence. All these differences except lower social isolation were non-significant after adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics. Privileged mothers felt more restricted by their parenting tasks (unadjusted comparison), and more privileged children were frequent television watchers. Child birth weight, health and behaviour were no better in the privileged than in average neighbourhoods. This paper adds to previous knowledge by showing that status-based geographic differences in important parenting and health parameters can be non-significant in an equitable society such as Sweden, where all families with young children have access to free high-quality health services. Individual characteristics could provide better explanations than neighbourhood status.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 23, no 1, 19-25 p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-162984DOI: 10.1515/ijamh.2011.004PubMedID: 21721359OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-162984DiVA: diva2:462262
Available from: 2011-12-06 Created: 2011-12-06 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Lagerberg, DagmarMagnusson, MargarethaSundelin, Claes

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