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Decreased bone mineral density in young adults treated with SCT in childhood: the role of 25-hydroxyvitamin D
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. (Barnonkologisk forskning/Pfeifer)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. (Barnonkologisk forskning/Pfeifer)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. (Metabola bensjukdomar)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. (Barnendokrinologisk forskning/Gustafsson)
2012 (English)In: Bone Marrow Transplantation, ISSN 0268-3369, E-ISSN 1476-5365, Vol. 47, no 5, 657-662 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We measured bone mineral density (BMD) with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in the total body, at the lumbar spine, at the femoral neck and in the total hip, in 18 young adults with a median of 18.2 years after SCT. Fifteen patients had undergone auto-SCT and all patients had received TBI. The patients had significantly lower BMD in the total body, at the femoral neck, and in the total hip compared with age- and sex-matched controls. Six of 18 patients (33%) had low bone mass (z-score <−1) at one or more measurement sites, as opposed to two of the controls (11%, P=0.29). We found no significant influence of growth hormone levels or of untreated hypogonadism on BMD variables. Levels of 25-hydroxy (25(OH)) vitamin D were lower among the patients (35.2 vs 48.8 nmol/L, P=0.044) and were significantly correlated with total body BMD in the patient group (r=0.55, P=0.021). All six patients with low bone mass had hypovitaminosis D (37 nmol/L as opposed to 4 of the 11 (36%) patients without low bone mass (P=0.035). In conclusion, we found decreased BMD in SCT survivors, which may in part be caused by 25(OH) vitamin D deficiency.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 47, no 5, 657-662 p.
Keyword [en]
SCT, bone mineral density, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, growth hormone, 25(OH) vitamin D
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-163698DOI: 10.1038/bmt.2011.147ISI: 000303923500008PubMedID: 21765478OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-163698DiVA: diva2:464591
Available from: 2011-12-13 Created: 2011-12-13 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Frisk, PerArvidson, JohanLjunggren, ÖstenGustafsson, Jan

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