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Job strain in relation to body mass index: pooled analysis of 160 000 adults from 13 cohort studies
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2012 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 272, no 1, 65-73 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background.

Evidence of an association between job strain and obesity is inconsistent, mostly limited to small-scale studies, and does not distinguish between categories of underweight or obesity subclasses.

Objectives.

To examine the association between job strain and body mass index (BMI) in a large adult population.

Methods. 

We performed a pooled cross-sectional analysis based on individual-level data from 13 European studies resulting in a total of 161 746 participants (49% men, mean age, 43.7 years). Longitudinal analysis with a median follow-up of 4 years was possible for four cohort studies (n = 42 222).

Results. 

A total of 86 429 participants were of normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg m(-2) ), 2149 were underweight (BMI < 18.5 kg m(-2) ), 56 572 overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9 kg m(-2) ) and 13 523 class I (BMI 30-34.9 kg m(-2) ) and 3073 classes II/III (BMI ≥ 35 kg m(-2) ) obese. In addition, 27 010 (17%) participants reported job strain. In cross-sectional analyses, we found increased odds of job strain amongst underweight [odds ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.25], obese class I (odds ratio 1.07, 95% CI 1.02-1.12) and obese classes II/III participants (odds ratio 1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.28) as compared with participants of normal weight. In longitudinal analysis, both weight gain and weight loss were related to the onset of job strain during follow-up.

Conclusions. 

In an analysis of European data, we found both weight gain and weight loss to be associated with the onset of job strain, consistent with a 'U'-shaped cross-sectional association between job strain and BMI. These associations were relatively modest; therefore, it is unlikely that intervention to reduce job strain would be effective in combating obesity at a population level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 272, no 1, 65-73 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-165315DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02482.xISI: 000305510600007PubMedID: 22077620OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-165315DiVA: diva2:472902
Available from: 2012-01-04 Created: 2012-01-04 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Westerholm, Peter

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