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The significance of Carl Wiman's sauropod dinosaurs
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. (Benjamin Kear - Vertebrate Palaeontology Research Group)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
2011 (English)In: The 2nd Wiman Meeting. Carl Wiman's Legacy: 100 Years of Swedish Palaeontology / [ed] Benjamin P. Kear and Michael Streng, 2011, 20-21 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Of the Mesozoic vertebrate fossils received and published on by Carl Wiman during his diverse career as Sweden's first Professor of Palaeontology, his sauropod dinosaurs arguably remain some of the most significant to modern researchers. In particular, Euhelopus [Helopus] zdanskyi described by Wiman in 1929 from the Lower Cretaceous Qingshan Formation of China is one of the best-known taxa, being represented by a partial skull and associated presacral axial skeleton, referred dorsal vertebral series, complete hind limb, and partial forelimb. Paradoxically, the anatomy, phylogenetic relationships, and stratigraphical disposition of Euhelopus have until recently been highly controversial. Indeed, on-going work is now focused upon the biomechanical aspects of the skull and ultimately will undertake a complete CT-based reconstruction of the head and neck to investigate eco-morphological adaptations amongst titanosauriforms. Wiman's other important sauropod discoveries include several isolated vertebrae also from the Qingshan Formation: (1) a caudal interpreted as the first Asian diplodocid; and (2) a cervical and dorsal, both of which are under study but might represent other titanosauriform taxa. Another collection of sauropod postcranial elements (an ilium, cervical vertebra, and three sacral vertebrae) sent by the famous American dinosaur collector Charles H. Sternberg in 1921, might represent components of the holotype of Alamosaurus sanjuanensis, a Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) titanosaurid from the Kirtland Formation of New Mexico. Despite having been in the scientific spotlight for more than 80 years, Carl Wiman's specimens are still critical to the broader understanding of Cretaceous sauropod evolution.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. 20-21 p.
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-166624OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-166624DiVA: diva2:476962
Conference
The 2nd Wiman Meeting on Scandinavian-Baltic Palaeontology
Available from: 2012-01-12 Created: 2012-01-12 Last updated: 2013-01-07

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Poropat, Stephen F.Kear, Benjamin P.

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