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Central nervous system stem/progenitor cells form neurons and peripheral glia after transplantation to the dorsal root ganglion.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
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2006 (English)In: NeuroReport, ISSN 0959-4965, E-ISSN 1473-558X, Vol. 17, no 6, 623-628 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We asked whether neural stem/progenitor cells from the cerebral cortex of E14.5 enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic mice are able to survive grafting and differentiate in the adult rat dorsal root ganglion. Neurospheres were placed in lumbar dorsal root ganglion cavities after removal of the dorsal root ganglia. Alternatively, dissociated neurospheres were injected into intact dorsal root ganglia. Enhanced green fluorescent protein-positive cells in the dorsal root ganglion cavity were located in clusters and expressed beta-III-tubulin or glial fibrillary acidic protein after 1 month, whereas after 3 months, surviving grafted cells expressed only glial fibrillary acidic protein. In the intact adult DRG, transplanted neural stem/progenitor cells surrounded dorsal root ganglion cells and fibers, and expressed glial but not neuronal markers. These findings show that central nervous system stem/progenitor cells can survive and differentiate into neurons and peripheral glia after xenotransplantation to the adult dorsal root ganglion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 17, no 6, 623-628 p.
Keyword [en]
Actins/genetics, animals, cell differentiation/physiology, cells, cultured, Cerebral Cortex/*cytology/embryology, embryo, ganglia, spinal/*cytology/transplantation, gene expression/physiology, green fluorescent, Proteins/genetics, immunohistochemistry/methods, intermediate filament proteins/metabolism, mice, mice, inbred C57BL, transgenic, nerve tissue proteins/metabolism, neuroglia/*physiology, neurons/*physiology, stem cell transplantation/methods, stem cells/*physiology, time factors, tubulin/metabolism, nerve regeneration, neural stem/progenitor cell, satellite cell, Schwann cell, sensory neuron, spinal cord
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-22831ISI: 000237529300013PubMedID: 16603923OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-22831DiVA: diva2:50604
Available from: 2007-03-01 Created: 2007-03-01 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells as a Tool for Tissue Regeneration
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells as a Tool for Tissue Regeneration
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPC) can differentiate to neurons and glial cells. NSPC are easily propagated in vitro and are therefore an attractive tool for tissue regeneration. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause for death and disabilities. A fundamental problem following TBI is tissue loss. Animal studies aiming at cell replacement have encountered difficulties in achieving sufficient graft survival and differentiation. To improve outcome of grafted cells after experimental TBI (controlled cortical impact, CCI) in mice, we compared two transplantation settings. NSPC were transplanted either directly upon CCI to the injured parenchyma, or one week after injury to the contralateral ventricle. Enhanced survival of transplanted cells and differentiation were seen when cells were deposited in the ventricle. To further enhance cell survival, efforts were made to reduce the inflammatory response to TBI by administration of ibuprofen to mice that had been subjected to CCI. Inflammation was reduced, as monitored by a decrease in inflammatory markers. Cell survival as well as differentiation to early neuroblasts seemed to be improved.

To device a 3D system for future transplantation studies, NSPC from different ages were cultured in a hydrogel consisting of hyaluronan and collagen. Cells survived and proliferated in this culturing condition and the greatest neuronal differentiating ability was seen in cells from the newborn mouse brain.

NSPC were also used in a model of peripheral nervous system injury, and xeno-transplanted to rats where the dorsal root ganglion had been removed. Cells survived and differentiated to neurons and glia, furthermore demonstrating their usefulness as a tool for tissue regeneration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2009. 69 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 500
Keyword
traumatic brain injury, neural stem cells, transplantation, CNS, PNS, progenitor cells, inflammation, CCI
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Research subject
Neurosurgery; Medical Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-110095 (URN)978-91-554-7658-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2009-12-17, B42, Husargatan 3, BMC, 09:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2009-11-26 Created: 2009-11-03 Last updated: 2009-11-26Bibliographically approved

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Sandelin, MartinWallenquist, UlrikaForsberg-Nilsson, KarinAldskogius, HåkanKozlova, Elena N.

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