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Bone mineral density changes in relation to environmental PCB exposure
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8949-3555
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2008 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 116, no 9, 1162-1166 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Bone toxicity has been linked to organochlorine exposure following a few notable poisoning incidents, but epidemiologic studies in populations with environmental organochlorine exposure have yielded inconsistent results.

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate whether organochlorine exposure was associated with bone mineral density (BMD) in a population 60-81 years of age (154 males, 167 females) living near the Baltic coast, close to a river contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

METHODS: We measured forearm BMD in participants using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry; and we assessed low BMD using age- and sex-standardized Z-scores. We analyzed blood samples for five dioxin-like PCBs, the three most abundant non-dioxin-like PCBs, and p,p'-dichloro-phenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE).

RESULTS: In males, dioxin-like chlorobiphenyl (CB)-118 was negatively associated with BMD; the odds ratio for low BMD (Z-score less than -1) was 1.06 (95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.12) per 10 pg/mL CB-118. The sum of the three most abundant non-dioxin-like PCBs was positively associated with BMD, but not with a decreased risk of low BMD. In females, CB-118 was positively associated with BMD, but this congener did not influence the risk of low BMD in women.

CONCLUSIONS: Environmental organochlorine exposures experienced by this population sample since the 1930s in Sweden may have been sufficient to result in sex-specific changes in BMD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 116, no 9, 1162-1166 p.
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Basic Medicine
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-169562DOI: 10.1289/ehp.11107PubMedID: 18795157OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-169562DiVA: diva2:507266
Available from: 2012-03-02 Created: 2012-03-02 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Lind, Monica

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