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Disorders of consciousness: Preliminary data supports added value of extended behavioural assessment
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
2012 (English)In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 26, no 2, 188-193 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The use of validated behavioural assessment scales in assessment of patients with Disorders of Consciousness (DOC) is well established. However, there is little evidence to guide decisions on total time spent in behavioural assessment.

Objective: To assess whether brief behavioural assessment was as effective as extended behavioural assessment in detecting non-vegetative behaviours.

Methods: Consecutive patients with suspected DOC were assessed with two standardized instruments: Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R) and Sensory Modality Assessment and Rehabilitation Technique (SMART). Assessors were blinded to results from the other scale at the point of assessment. Two administrations of CRS-R together took 50-60 minutes ('brief' assessment). One complete SMART assessment took 600 minutes ('extended' assessment). Patients were classified as being in a vegetative state (VS) or minimally conscious state (MCS)/emerged from minimally conscious state (EMCS), following brief and extended assessment.

Results: Ten patients were assessed. Brief and extended assessment yielded the same diagnostic category (VS or MCS) for six patients and different categories for four, with extended assessment detecting higher level behaviours.

Conclusions: Brief behavioural assessment was not as effective as extended assessment in detecting non-vegetative behaviours. Total time spent in behavioural assessment is likely important. Further studies and clearer clinical guidance are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 26, no 2, 188-193 p.
Keyword [en]
Vegetative state, minimally conscious state, disorders of consciousness, behavioural assessment, brain injury
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-171438DOI: 10.3109/02699052.2011.648708ISI: 000300658200008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-171438DiVA: diva2:510901
Available from: 2012-03-19 Created: 2012-03-19 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Godbolt, Alison K.

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