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Nanowired drug delivery for neuroprotection in central nervous system injuries: modulation by environmental temperature, intoxication of nanoparticles, and comorbidity factors
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
2012 (English)In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology, ISSN 1939-5116, Vol. 4, no 2, 184-203 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent developments in nanomedicine resulted in targeted drug delivery of active compounds into the central nervous system (CNS) either through encapsulated material or attached to nanowires. Nanodrug delivery by any means is supposed to enhance neuroprotection due to rapid accumulation of drugs within the target area and a slow metabolism of the compound. These two factors enhance neuroprotection than the conventions drug delivery. However, this is still uncertain whether nanodrug delivery could alter the pharmacokinetics of compounds making it more effective or just longer exposure of the compound for extended period of time is primarily responsible for enhanced effects of the drugs. Our laboratory is engaged in understanding of the nanodrug delivery using TiO2 nanowires in CNS injuries models, for example, spinal cord injury (SCI), hyperthermia and/or intoxication of nanoparticles with or without other comorbidity factors, that is, diabetes or hypertension in rat models. Our observations suggest that nanowired drug delivery is effective under normal situation of SCI and hyperthermia as evidenced by significant reduction in the bloodbrain barrier (BBB) breakdown, brain edema formation, cognitive disturbances, neuronal damages, and brain pathologies. However, when the pathophysiology of these CNS injuries is aggravated by nanoparticles intoxication or comorbidity factors, adjustment in dosage of nanodrug delivery is needed. This indicates that further research in nanomedicine is needed to explore suitable strategies in achieving greater neuroprotection in CNS injury in combination with nanoparticles intoxication or other comorbidity factors for better clinical practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 4, no 2, 184-203 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-171540DOI: 10.1002/wnan.172ISI: 000300569700004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-171540DiVA: diva2:511365
Available from: 2012-03-21 Created: 2012-03-21 Last updated: 2012-03-21Bibliographically approved

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Sharma, Hari ShankerSharma, Aruna

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