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Peduncular attached secondary tiering acrotretoid brachiopods from the Chengjiang fauna: Implications for the ecological expansion of brachiopods during the Cambrian explosion
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
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2012 (English)In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 323-325, 60-67 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Brachiopods are usually thought to contribute little to the tiering complexity from the Paleozoic to the Recent, mainly due to the fact that their recent representatives live primarily in lower tiers directly above or below the water-sediment interface. Here we present the first and oldest record of varied levels of secondary tiering in minute brachiopods attached by exceptionally preserved thread-like pedicles around the branched fronds of the algae-like Malongitubus kuangshanensis Hu, 2005. The specimens illustrated herein were recovered from the Chengjiang fauna (Series 2, Stage 3) in the Lower Cambrian Heilinpu Formation at the Kuangshan section in Malong County, Yunnan Province, southern China. The micro-morphology and oval outline of the attached brachiopods demonstrate that they can be assigned to acrotretoid brachiopods (Linguliformea, Lingulata, Acrotretoidea), described here as Kuangshanotreta malungensis gen. et sp. nov. This is the first report on the occurrence of acrotretoid brachiopods in the Lower Cambrian muddy deposits from southern China. The posterior margins of the Kuangshanotreta shells are invariably either in direct contact with, or directed towards, and then in situ attached to the algal frond of M. kuangshanensis, indicating a secondary tiering in the ecological structure of Early Cambrian brachiopods. The acrotretoid Kuangshanotreta/algae malongitubus association represents both the first and oldest evidence into the enigmatic paleoecology of the diverse acrotretoid linguliformean stock that comprises an important component of the Cambrian evolutionary fauna, and sheds light on medium-high levels of secondary tiering (+5 to +10 cm) Cambrian soft substrate suspension-feeding communities. When compared to other Chengjiang brachiopods, the miniature morphology and concomitant weight reduction of the shell of K. malungensis may be a good adaption to a suspended epifaunal tiering life style. We infer that the diversification of micromorphic and miniaturized acrotretoids that occurred from the Middle Cambrian to Early Ordovician may be the result of the increased availability of habitable surfaces provided by high levels of tiering in new types of ecological spaces.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 323-325, 60-67 p.
Keyword [en]
Cambrian, Brachiopods, Lingulata, Acrotretoidea, Epifauna, Secondary tiering
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-174009DOI: 10.1016/j.palaeo.2012.01.027ISI: 000302524000005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-174009DiVA: diva2:526100
Available from: 2012-05-10 Created: 2012-05-09 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Origin and Lifestyles of early Brachiopods and other Lophotrochozoans: Insights from the Chengjiang and Guanshan Fossil-Lagerstätten
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Origin and Lifestyles of early Brachiopods and other Lophotrochozoans: Insights from the Chengjiang and Guanshan Fossil-Lagerstätten
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

One of the great unsolved evolutionary questions concerns the origin and phylogeny of the major animal phyla that appeared in the fossil record more than 540 million years ago, during the Cambrian explosion. Although new molecular information has been very useful, we still have little understanding about the origin of most of the phyla of bilaterians living today. The richly diverse fossil remains from this critical early Cambrian interval are particularly well exposed in China, where exceptionally-preserved fossil lophotrochozoans including brachiopods are particularly abundant. In particular the exceptionally-preserved Cambrian lophophorates from the Chengjiang and Guanshan Lagerstätten have offered new sources of critical palaeobiological data that have been shown to be important for understanding the early ecology and evolution of lophotrochozoans. This thesis comprises a detailed study of new, abundant, exceptionally-preserved material of five lophotrochozoan species from the Chengjiang and Guanshan Lagerstätten. Kuangshanotreta malungensis from Chengjiang is the earliest known example of an attached acrotretoid brachiopod representing the oldest evidence about the palaeoecology of the diverse yet, enigmatic acrotretoid linguliform stock that comprises an important component of the Cambrian evolutionary fauna. Eoglossa chengjiangensis from Chengjiang is the earliest known representative of the Glossellinae. Diandongia pista occurs abundantly both in the Chengjiang fauna and the younger Guanshan fauna, and it’s exceptionally well-preserved and strongly mineralized shells shows that it belongs within the Botsfordiidae. In contrast, the last two species from Chengjiang examined for this thesis - Yuganotheca elegans and Cotyledion tylodes belong within the stem of the Brachiopoda and the Lophotrochozoan entoprocts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2014
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 1198
Keyword
Cambrian Explosion, Chengjiang, Guanshan, Lagerstätten, Lophotrochozoa, Brachiopoda
National Category
Geology Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-234843 (URN)978-91-554-9092-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-12-12, Axel Hambergsalen, Geocentrum, Villavägen 16, Uppsala, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-11-20 Created: 2014-10-24 Last updated: 2015-02-03

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Wang, HaizhouHolmer, Lars E.

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