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Increased lipolysis in LCHAD deficiency
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Barnendokrinologisk forskning/Tuvemo)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Barnendokrinologisk forskning/Tuvemo)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
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2007 (English)In: Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease, ISSN 0141-8955, E-ISSN 1573-2665, Vol. 30, no 1, 39-46 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An increasing number of fatty acid oxidation defects are being detected owing to diagnostic improvements and a greater awareness among clinicians. The metabolic block leads to energy disruption, fatty infiltration, and toxic effects on organ functions exerted by β-oxidation metabolites. This investigation was undertaken to assess the influence of long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) deficiency on lipolysis and energy turnover. We addressed the question whether the lipolysis and glucose production rates would be altered in the fasting state in a child with this disease. Lipolysis, glucose production and resting energy expenditure (REE) were studied in a 17-month-old girl with LCHAD deficiency and her healthy twin sister. Lipolysis and glucose production were determined after a 4–6 h fast by constant-rate infusion of [1,1,2,3,3-2H5]glycerol and [6,6-2H2]glucose and analysis by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. REE was estimated by indirect calorimetry. The affected girl showed 50% higher lipolysis than did her sister, whereas the glucose production rates were similar. Plasma levels of dicarboxylic acids of 6–12 carbon atoms chain length, 3-hydroxy fatty acids of 6–18 carbon atoms chain length, total free fatty acids, and acylcarnitines were increased in the patient, as was REE. Since glucose production rates and plasma glucose levels were similar in the two girls, the increased lipolysis observed in the patient probably represents a compensatory mechanism for energy generation. This is achieved at the price of an augmented risk for fatty acid infiltration and toxic effects of β-oxidation intermediates. This highlights the importance of avoiding fasting in these patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 30, no 1, 39-46 p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-25070DOI: 10.1007/s10545-006-0296-xISI: 000243613500005PubMedID: 17160563OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-25070DiVA: diva2:52844
Available from: 2007-02-09 Created: 2007-02-09 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Gustafsson, Jan

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