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Geographic variation in corticosterone response to chronic predator stress in tadpoles
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Population and Conservation Biology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Population and Conservation Biology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6748-966X
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Population and Conservation Biology.
2012 (English)In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 25, no 6, 1066-1076 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chronic stress often affects growth and development negatively, and these effects are often mediated via glucocorticoid hormones, which elevate during stress. We investigated latitudinal variation in corticosterone (CORT) response to chronic predator stress in Rana temporaria tadpoles along a 1500-km latitudinal cline in Sweden tadpoles, in a laboratory experiment. We hypothesized that more time-constrained high-latitude populations have evolved a lower CORT response to chronic stress to maintain higher growth under stressful conditions. Southern tadpoles had higher CORT content in response to predators after 1 day of exposure, whereas there was no increase in CORT in the northern populations. Two weeks later, there were no predator-induced CORT elevations. Artificially elevated CORT levels strongly decreased growth, development and survival in both northern and southern tadpoles. We suggest that the lower CORT response in high-latitude populations can be connected with avoidance of CORT-mediated reduction in growth and development, but also discuss other possible explanations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 25, no 6, 1066-1076 p.
Keyword [en]
Glucocorticoids, growth, hormones, latitudinal gradient, life history, metamorphosis, predator-induced plasticity, Rana temporaria, time-stressed populations
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-175604DOI: 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2012.02493.xISI: 000304033000006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-175604DiVA: diva2:533149
Available from: 2012-06-13 Created: 2012-06-11 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Dahl, EmmaOrizaola, GermanWinberg, SvanteLaurila, Anssi

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