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Reliance on prey-derived nitrogen by the carnivorous plant Drosera rotundifolia decreases with increasing nitrogen deposition
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
2012 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 195, no 1, 182-188 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Carnivory in plants is presumed to be an adaptation to a low-nutrient environment. Nitrogen (N) from carnivory is expected to become a less important component of the N budget as root N availability increases. Here, we investigated the uptake of N via roots versus prey of the carnivorous plant Drosera rotundifolia growing in ombrotrophic bogs along a latitudinal N deposition gradient through Sweden, using a natural abundance stable isotope mass balance technique. Drosera rotundifolia plants receiving the lowest level of N deposition obtained a greater proportion of N from prey (57%) than did plants on bogs with higher N deposition (22% at intermediate and 33% at the highest deposition). When adjusted for differences in plant mass, this pattern was also present when considering total prey N uptake (66, 26 and 26 mu g prey N per plant at the low, intermediate and high N deposition sites, respectively). The pattern of mass-adjusted root N uptake was opposite to this (47, 75 and 86 mu g N per plant). Drosera rotundifolia plants in this study switched from reliance on prey N to reliance on root-derived N as a result of increasing N availability from atmospheric N deposition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 195, no 1, 182-188 p.
Keyword [en]
carnivorous plants, nutrient use, plant-animal interactions, pollution, stable isotope analysis
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-176796DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2012.04139.xISI: 000304448500021OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-176796DiVA: diva2:537757
Available from: 2012-06-27 Created: 2012-06-26 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Svensson, Brita M.Rydin, Håkan

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