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Perception of cockpit environment among pilots on commercial aircraft
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. (Eva Vingård)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. (Eva Vingård)
2006 (English)In: Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 0095-6562, E-ISSN 1943-4448, Vol. 77, no 8, 832-837 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Impaired cockpit environment may influence both well-being and performance of pilots. Objective: To study the perception of cockpit environment among pilots, in relation to demographic factors, and type of air craft (B767-300, B737-600, DC9/21-41, MD 81/90 series). Methods: A standardized questionnaire was mailed to all pilots in one airline company; 81% participated (n = 622). All flights were non-smoking flights and the B767 was the only aircraft operated on intercontinental flights. The DC9 was the only aircraft without air recirculation. Multiple logistic regression analysis was applied, controlling for age, gender, smoking, perceived psychosocial work environment, and type of aircraft. Results: Younger age and a history of atopy and stress due to excess work were the main predictors of symptom and environmental perceptions. The most common symptoms were fatigue (14%), facial dermal (10%), and nasal symptoms (9%). Common complaints on cockpit environment were dry air (53%), dust and dirt (48%), noise (46%), and inadequate illumination (34%). Using the DC9 as a reference category, Boeing 767 pilots had more fatigue (OR 19.5; p < 0.001), throat symptoms (OR = 4.40; p < 0.05), complaints on dry air (OR = 2.93; p < 0.01), stuffy air (OR = 4.60; p < 0.01), static electricity (OR = 6.39; < 0.05), and dust (OR = 2.01; p < 0.05). Boeing 737 pilots had more complaints on noise (OR = 4.01; p < 0.001) and dust (OR = 1.81; p < 0.05). MD 81/90 pilots had more complaints on dry air (OR = 1.76; p < 0.05), dust (OR = 1.92; p < 0.05), and inadequate illumination (OR = 2.08; p < 0.05). Conclusion: Complaints on the cockpit environment were common and differed between different types of aircraft. This indicates a need to optimize the cockpit environment, e.g., increase the cleaning and relative air humidity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 77, no 8, 832-837 p.
Keyword [en]
aviation medicine, cockpit air quality, indoor air pollution, noise, occupational medicine, psychosocial work environment
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-26029ISI: 000239507300007PubMedID: 16909877OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-26029DiVA: diva2:53803
Available from: 2007-02-14 Created: 2007-02-14 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Lindgren, TorstenNorbäck, Dan

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