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When Do Short Children Realize They Are Short?: Prepubertal Short Children's Perception of Height during 24 Months of Catch-Up Growth Hormone Treatment
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
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2012 (English)In: Hormone Research in Paediatrics, ISSN 1663-2818, Vol. 77, no 4, 241-249 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To examine perceived height during the first 24 months of growth hormone (GH) treatment in short prepubertal children. Methods: Ninety-nine 3- to 11-year-old short prepubertal children with either isolated GH deficiency (n = 32) or idiopathic short stature (n = 67) participated in a 24-month randomized trial of individualized or fixed-dose GH treatment. Children's and parents' responses to three perceived height measures: relative height (Silhouette Apperception Test), sense of height (VAS short/tall), and judgment of appropriate height (yes/no) were compared to measured height. Results: Children and parents overestimated height at start (72%, 54%) and at 24 months (52%, 30%). Short children described themselves as tall until 8.2 years (girls) and 9 years (boys). Prior to treatment, 38% of children described their height as appropriate and at 3 months, 63%. Mother's height, parental sense of the child's tallness and age explained more variance in children's sense of tallness (34%) than measured height (0%). Conclusion: Short children and parents overestimate height; a pivotal age exists for comparative height judgments. Even a small gain in height may be enough for the child to feel an appropriate age-related height has been reached and to no longer feel short. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 77, no 4, 241-249 p.
Keyword [en]
Children, Growth hormone treatment, Height determination, Height prediction, Puberty, Quality of life, Short stature, Height perception
National Category
Pediatrics Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-177643DOI: 10.1159/000337975ISI: 000305678400006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-177643DiVA: diva2:541362
Available from: 2012-07-17 Created: 2012-07-17 Last updated: 2012-07-17Bibliographically approved

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Halldin Stenlid, Maria

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