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The Communicative Constitution of an IT-Unit in an Organization Applying Enterprise Architecture (EA)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
2011 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Description
Abstract [en]

All embracing Internet Technology (IT) provides opportunities for contemporary organizations but it also presents a number of organizational challenges. For one thing, the rapid IT development have caused or forced individual organizational units to develop their own IT solutions, often resulting in a remarkable number of different solutions in one single organization. Today, this is seldom regarded as being efficient and management often works to consolidate IT. Such work requires that the IT unit’s co-workers are familiar with all the IT solutions currently present in the organization. Another challenge is that there often is a discrepancy between the provided IT solution and the need of the end user. To avoid this entails that the IT co-workers are well aware of the business needs. Various models and methods have been applied to deal with these challenges. Forming the IT unit in a matrix organization is one attempt. Enterprise Architecture (EA), with the main purpose of providing a holistic view of the organization, is another attempt which often embraces the matrix structure. The focus in this paper is to explore how an IT unit, working according to these premises, is being communicatively constituted. The analysis rests on McPhee and Zaug’s (2000) four-flows framework. Considering the prevailing conditions for the IT unit, activity coordination appears to be the most important flow in the constitution of the IT unit, which would premiere Taylor’s (2009) view of the four-flows framework. However, the results from our case study indicate that that the interdependence of the four communications flows is indispensible in order to communicatively constitute the IT unit. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011.
Keyword [en]
Information technology, organizational communication, enterprise architecture (EA), communicative constitution of organization (CCO), four-flows of communication framework
National Category
Media and Communications Communication Studies Information Systems
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-181372OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-181372DiVA: diva2:555981
Conference
The 20th Nordic Conference for Media and Communication Research.
Available from: 2012-09-23 Created: 2012-09-23 Last updated: 2017-03-30

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
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More styles
Language
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Output format
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  • asciidoc
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