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Keynote: Safe and efficient in-vivo gene gene transfer and silencing technologies using natural pathways
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Polymer Chemistry.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Polymer Chemistry.
2012 (English)In: Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, ISSN 1932-6254, Vol. 6, no suppl 1, 190-190 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The advance in nucleic acids therapeutic had been outstanding in recent years, which have opened new possibilities in regenerative medicine to tackle many serious diseases. To make nucleic acids based therapy a reality, the fundamental problem of tissue specific cellular delivery has to be accomplished. Here we present a new approach to develop the next generation of delivery vectors.

Materials and methods: Hyaluronic acid were modified to complex DNA plasmids for luciferase transfection. Transfection: HCT 116 cells and mice where tranfected by adding HA-DNA complex. The transfection experiment with commercially available reagent polyethyleneimine (PEI) and plasmid alone were used as controls.

Results and discussion: Efficient tranfection was shown using the new non toxic and safe non viral vector. Using ECM components (such as hyaluronic acid or HA) that allow both in vitroandin vivo transfection of plasmid DNA in CD44 positive cells. The chemically modified ECM components (non-toxic) binds to nucleic acids and are taken in by cells by natural receptor mediated endocytosis. The amount transported via these routes naturally is around 10 gram per day to give a potential capacity far exceeding the need for transfection if it is targeted. By molecular association strategies (joining the bandwagon) it is now possible for nucleic acids to follow these pathways that utilise the highly efficient receptor mediated endocytosis- door opener into cells.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 6, no suppl 1, 190-190 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Polymer Chemistry
Research subject
Chemistry with specialization in Polymer Chemistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-182409DOI: 10.1002/term.1586ISI: 000308313001301OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-182409DiVA: diva2:560271
Available from: 2012-10-12 Created: 2012-10-10 Last updated: 2013-01-08Bibliographically approved

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Hilborn, JönsVarghese, Oommen P.

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