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Which provenance and where?: Seed sourcing strategies for revegetation in a changing environment
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
Australian Centre for Evolutionary Biology and Biodiversity (ACEBB) and School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide.
Australian Centre for Evolutionary Biology and Biodiversity (ACEBB) and School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide.
Australian Centre for Evolutionary Biology and Biodiversity (ACEBB) and School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide.
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2013 (English)In: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737, Vol. 14, no 1, 1-10 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Revegetation is one practical application of science that should ideally aim to combine ecology with evolution to maximise biodiversity and ecosystem outcomes. The strict use of locally sourced seed in revegetation programs is widespread and is based on the expectation that populations are locally adapted. This practice does not fully integrate two global drivers of ecosystem change and biodiversity loss: habitat fragmentation and climate change. Here, we suggest amendments to existing strategies combined with a review of alternative seed-sourcing strategies that propose to mitigate against these drivers. We present a provenancing selection guide based on confidence surrounding climate change distribution modelling and data on population genetic and/or environmental differences between populations. Revegetation practices will benefit from greater integration of current scientific developments and establishment of more long-term experiments is key to improving the long-term success. The rapid growth in carbon and biodiversity markets creates a favourable economic climate to achieve these outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 14, no 1, 1-10 p.
National Category
Botany Evolutionary Biology Ecology Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Conservation Biology; Earth Science with specialization in Environmental Analysis
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-184969DOI: 10.1007/s10592-012-0425-zISI: 000314065200001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-184969DiVA: diva2:569969
Available from: 2012-11-15 Created: 2012-11-15 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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Breed, Martin F.

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