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Cytomegalovirus-Specific CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses in Infants and Children
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
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2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 77, no 2, 135-143 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the most common congenital infection causing childhood morbidity. The pathogenetic mechanisms behind long-term sequelae are unclear, but long-standing viremia as a consequence of the inability to convert the virus to a latent state has been suggested to be involved. Whereas primary CMV infection in adults is typically rapidly controlled by the immune system, children have been shown to excrete virus for years. Here, we compare T-cell responses in children with congenital CMV infection, children with postnatal CMV infection and adults with symptomatic primary CMV infection. The study groups included 24 children with congenital CMV infection, 19 children with postnatal CMV infection and 8 adults with primary CMV infection. Among the infants with congenital CMV infection, 13 were symptomatic. T-cell responses were determined by analysis of interferon gamma-production after stimulation with CMV antigen. Our results show that whereas adults display high CMV-specific CD4 T-cell responses in the initial phase of the infection, children younger than 2 years have low or undetectable responses that appear to increase with time. There were no differences between groups with regard to CD8 T-cell function. In conclusion, inadequate CD 4 T-cell function seem to be involved in the failure to get immune control of the CMV infection in children younger than 2 years of age with congenital as well as postnatal CMV infection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 77, no 2, 135-143 p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-188651DOI: 10.1111/sji.12013ISI: 000316701500008PubMedID: 23216075OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-188651DiVA: diva2:578553
Available from: 2012-12-18 Created: 2012-12-18 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Lidehäll, Anna KarinSund, FredrikEwald, UweTötterman, Thomas HKorsgren, OlleEriksson, Britt-Marie

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Lidehäll, Anna KarinSund, FredrikEwald, UweTötterman, Thomas HKorsgren, OlleEriksson, Britt-Marie
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Department of Immunology, Genetics and PathologyInfectious DiseasesPediatricsClinical Immunology
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