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Exposure to a single dose of ionising radiation during brain development can cause cognitive defects and increased levels of tau in mice
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Fakulteten för naturresurser och lantbruksvetenskap, Institutionen för Mark och miljö.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
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2012 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Ionising radiation (IR) is widely used in the medical field for treating tumours, including tumours in the central nervous system, and for imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT). There is a lack of knowledge and increasing concern about effects and consequences from low dose exposure during critical phases of perinatal and/or neonatal brain development compared to prenatal irradiation. It is known that IR causes neurotoxicological and neurobehavioural defects in mammals. Further, an epidemiological study has suggested that low doses of IR to the human brain during infancy can have a negative effect on cognitive abilities in adulthood. The rapid brain growth spurt (BGS) occurs in humans as well as mice. In humans the BGS starts during the third trimester of pregnancy and continues throughout the first two years of life. In mouse and rat the BGS is neonatal, spanning the first 3-4 weeks of life. The BGS is characterized by maturation of axonal and dendritic outgrowth, establishment of neural connections and acquisition of many new motor and sensory abilities. By using the neonatal mouse as an animal model we are able to study the effect of IR during early periods of brain development and which consequences it has for the adult animal. Disturbances in development caused by nicotine, MeHg, PCBs and PBDEs have previously been shown to alter adult spontaneous behaviour and/or neuroprotein levels in mice.

Neonatal NMRI male mice were irradiated (0; 0.35 and 0.5 Gy) at one single occasion on postnatal day 10. Mice serving as controls were placed in plastic dishes for a time-period corresponding to the irradiation. Spontaneous behaviour was tested in a novel home environment at 2- and 4-months of age and parameters observed were locomotion, rearing and total activity. Analyses of important neuroprotein levels were performed on 6-month-old control and 0.5 Gy irradiated mice.

Spontaneous behaviour test (locomotion, rearing, total activity revealed a significantly deranged behaviour in 2- and 4-month old mice irradiated with 0.35 or 0.5 Gy in a dose-response related manner, when compared to controls. The behavioural alterations were manifested as a reduced activity during at the beginning of the observational period and a higher activity at the end of the observational period. Analyses of the neuroprotein tau, which in human medicine is used as a biomarker for Alzheimer’s disease, showed a significantly higher level in mice irradiated with 0.5 Gy compared to controls. This demonstrates that a single dose of gamma radiation, given at a defined critical time period during brain development, is sufficient to cause persistently reduced cognitive functions and increased levels of tau in mice.   

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012.
National Category
Developmental Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-191382OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-191382DiVA, id: diva2:585533
Conference
42nd annual meeting of Society for Neuroscience, New Orleans,October 13-17, 2012
Note

Program#/Poster#: 354.24/T11

Presentation time: Monday, Oct 15, 2012, 10:00 AM -11:00 AM

Available from: 2013-01-10 Created: 2013-01-10 Last updated: 2013-07-05Bibliographically approved

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Buratovic, SonjaStenerlöw, BoFredriksson, AndersEriksson, Per

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