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Age, period and cohort effects on suicide mortality in Russia, 1956-2005
Sodertorn Univ, Stockholm Ctr Hlth & Social Change SCOHOST, Huddinge, Sweden..
Sodertorn Univ, Stockholm Ctr Hlth & Social Change SCOHOST, Huddinge, Sweden..
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0010-7863
Natl Inst Hlth Dev, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Tallinn, Estonia..
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2017 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 17, 235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Russian suicide mortality rates changed rapidly over the second half of the twentieth century. This study attempts to differentiate between underlying period and cohort effects in relation to the changes in suicide mortality in Russia between 1956 and 2005. Methods: Sex-and age-specific suicide mortality data were analyzed using an age-period-cohort (APC) approach. Descriptive analyses and APC modeling with log-linear Poisson regression were performed. Results: Strong period effects were observed for the years during and after Gorbachev ' s political reforms (including the anti-alcohol campaign) and for those following the break-up of the Soviet Union. After mutual adjustment, the cohort-and period-specific relative risk estimates for suicide revealed differing underlying processes. While the estimated period effects had an overall positive trend, cohort-specific developments indicated a positive trend for the male cohorts born between 1891 and 1931 and for the female cohorts born between 1891 and 1911, but a negative trend for subsequent cohorts. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the specific life experiences of cohorts may be important for variations in suicide mortality across time, in addition to more immediate effects of changes in the social environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 17, 235
Keyword [en]
Suicide, Russia, Age-period, cohort analysis
National Category
Sociology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-195316DOI: 10.1186/s12889-017-4158-2ISI: 000396054600003PubMedID: 28270123OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-195316DiVA: diva2:607498
Note

The manuscript version of this article (Age, period and cohort effects on suicide mortality in Russia, 1956-2007) is part of the thesis Suicide in Russia: A macro-sociological study http://uu.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2:608268

Available from: 2013-02-24 Created: 2013-02-24 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Suicide in Russia: A macro-sociological study
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Suicide in Russia: A macro-sociological study
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This work constitutes a macro-sociological study of suicide. The empirical focus is on suicide mortality in Russia, which is among the highest in the world and has, moreover, developed in a dramatic manner over the second half of the 20th century. Suicide mortality in contemporary Russia is here placed within the context of development over a longer time period through empirical studies on 1) the general and sex- and age-specific developments in suicide over the period 1870–2007, 2) underlying dynamics of Russian suicide mortality 1956–2005 pertaining to differences between age groups, time periods, and particular generations and 3) the continuity in the aggregate-level relationship between heavy alcohol consumption and suicide mortality from late Tsarist period to post-World War II Russia. In addition, a fourth study explores an alternative to Émile Durkheim’s dominating macro-sociological perspective on suicide by making use of Niklas Luhmann’s theory of social systems. With the help of Luhmann’s macro-sociological perspective it is possible to consider suicide and its causes also in terms of processes at the individual level (i.e. at the level of psychic systems) in a manner that contrasts with the ‘holistic’ perspective of Durkheim. The results of the empirical studies show that Russian suicide mortality, despite its exceptionally high level and dramatic changes in the contemporary period, shares many similarities with the patterns seen in Western countries when examined over a longer time period. Societal modernization in particular seems to have contributed to the increased rate of suicide in Russia in a manner similar to what happened earlier in Western Europe. In addition, the positive relationship between heavy alcohol consumption and suicide mortality proved to be remarkably stable across the past one and a half centuries. These results were interpreted using the Luhmannian perspective on suicide developed in this work. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2013. 66 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Social Sciences, ISSN 1652-9030 ; 87
Series
Södertörn Doctoral Dissertations, ISSN 1652-7399 ; 76
Keyword
Suicide, Russia, historical development, time-series analysis, age-period-cohort analysis, Émile Durkheim, Niklas Luhmann
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-195318 (URN)978-91-554-8602-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2013-04-12, IV, Universitetshuset, Biskopsgatan 3, Uppsala, 10:15 (English)
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Supervisors
Available from: 2013-03-21 Created: 2013-02-24 Last updated: 2014-04-16Bibliographically approved

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Jukkala, TanyaMäkinen, Ilkka Henrik

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