uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Origin and demographic history of the endemic Taiwan spruce (Picea morrisonicola)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Evolutionary Functional Genomics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3344-6036
Taiwan Forestry Research Institute.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
2013 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 3, no 10, 3320-3333 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Taiwan spruce (Picea morrisonicola) is a vulnerable conifer species endemic to the island of Taiwan. A warming climate and competition from subtropical tree species has limited the range of Taiwan spruce to the higher altitudes of the island. Using seeds sampled from an area in the central mountain range of Taiwan, 15 nuclear loci were sequenced in order to measure genetic variation and to assess the long-term genetic stability of the species. Genetic diversity is low and comparable to other spruce species with limited ranges such as Picea breweriana, Picea chihuahuana, and Picea schrenkiana. Importantly, analysis using approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) provides evidence for a drastic decline in the effective population size approximately 0.3–0.5 million years ago (mya). We used simulations to show that this is unlikely to be a false-positive result due to the limited sample used here. To investigate the phylogenetic origin of Taiwan spruce, additional sequencing was performed in the Chinese spruce Picea wilsonii and combined with previously published data for three other mainland China species, Picea purpurea, Picea likiangensis, and P. schrenkiana. Analysis of population structure revealed that P. morrisonicola clusters most closely with P. wilsonii, and coalescent analyses using the program MIMAR dated the split to 4–8 mya, coincidental to the formation of Taiwan. Considering the population decrease that occurred after the split, however, led to a much more recent origin.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 3, no 10, 3320-3333 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Evolutionary Functional Genomics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-198100DOI: 10.1002/ece3.698ISI: 000324932600011OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-198100DiVA: diva2:615212
Note

De två (2) första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

Available from: 2013-04-09 Created: 2013-04-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Conservation Genetics and Speciation in Asian Forest Trees
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conservation Genetics and Speciation in Asian Forest Trees
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Tropical forests are important because they are the home of millions of species at the same time as they perform ecosystem services and provide food, cash income and raw materials for the people living there. The present thesis elucidates questions relevant to the conservation of selected forest trees as it adds to the knowledge in the phylogeny, population structure, genetic diversity and adaptation in these species.

We investigated the genetic diversity and speciation of four spruce species around the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP), Western China, and one from Taiwan. Nucleotide diversity was low in P. schrenkiana and the Taiwanese P. morrisonicola but higher in P. likiangensis, P. purpurea and P. wilsonii. This can be explained by the population bottlenecks that were detected in the two former species by coalescent-based analysis. The phylogenetic relationships between the five species were difficult to interpret, possibly because other Asian spruce species might have been involved. However, all species are distinct except P. purpurea, which likely has a hybrid origin. 

The rate of bud set and expression of the FTL2 gene in response to photoperiod in the southernmost growing spruce species, P. morrisonicola, was studied. We found that in this species, although growing near the equator, bud set appears to be induced mainly by a shortening of photoperiod, similarly to its more northerly growing spruce relatives. In addition, seedlings originating from mother trees growing at higher elevations showed a trend towards earlier bud set than seedlings originating from mother trees at lower altitudes.

We also studied the population structure and genetic diversity in the endemic white cedar (Dysoxylum malabaricum) in the Western Ghats, India. Overall, no increase in inbreeding that could be related to human activities could be detected. Populations appear to have maintained genetic diversity and gene flow in spite of forest fragmentation over the distribution range. However, there is a severe lack of juveniles and young adults in several populations that needs to be further addressed. Finally, we recommend conservation units based on population structure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2013. 45 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 1047
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Evolutionary Functional Genomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-198798 (URN)978-91-554-8676-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2013-06-14, Friessalen, EBC, Norbyvägen 14, Uppsala, 12:30 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Available from: 2013-05-22 Created: 2013-04-25 Last updated: 2013-08-30
2. Neutral and Adaptive Processes Shaping Genetic Variation in Spruce Species
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neutral and Adaptive Processes Shaping Genetic Variation in Spruce Species
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Population genetic analyses can provide information about both neutral and selective evolutionary processes shaping genetic variation. In this thesis, extensive population genetic methods were used to make inferences about genetic drift and selection in spruce species. In paper I we studied four species from the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP): Picea likiangensis, P. purpurea, P. wilsonii and P. schrenkiana. Big differences in estimates of genetic diversity and Ne were observed in the more restricted species, P. schrenkiana, and the other more widely distributed species. Furthermore, P. purpurea appears to be a hybrid between P. likiangensis and P. wilsonii. In paper II we used Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) to find that the data support a drastic reduction of Ne in Taiwan spruce around 300-500 kya, in line with evidence from the pollen records. The split from P. wilsonii was dated to between 4-8 mya, around the time that Taiwan was formed. These analyses relied on a small sample size, and so in Paper III we investigated the impact of small datasets on the power to distinguish between models in ABC. We found that when genetic diversity is low there is little power to distinguish between simple coalescent models and this can determine the number of samples and loci required.

In paper IV we studied the relative importance of genetic drift and selection in four spruce species with differing Ne: P. abies, P. glauca, P. jezoensis and P. breweriana. P. breweriana, which has a low Ne, exhibits a low fraction of adaptive substitutions, while P. abies has high Ne and a high fraction of adaptive substitutions. The other two spruce, however, do not support this suggesting other factors a more important. In paper V we find that several SNPs correlate with both a key adaptive trait (budset) and latitude. The expression of one in particular (PoFTL2) correlates with budset and was previously indentified in P. abies. These studies have helped characterise the importance of different population genetic processes in shaping genetic variation in spruce species and has laid some solid groundwork for future studies of spruce.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2013. 30 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 1078
Keyword
spruce, population genetics, adaptation, evolution, picea, approximate bayesian computation, cline
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-207714 (URN)978-91-554-8760-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2013-10-31, Lindahlsalen, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala, 09:30 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2013-10-10 Created: 2013-09-18 Last updated: 2014-01-23

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Bodare, SofiaStocks, MichaelLascoux, Martin

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Bodare, SofiaStocks, MichaelLascoux, Martin
By organisation
Evolutionary Functional GenomicsPlant Ecology and Evolution
In the same journal
Ecology and Evolution
Natural SciencesEvolutionary Biology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 557 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf