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Vegetation on hill slopes in southern Wello, Ethiopia: Degradation and regeneration
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecological Botany.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecological Botany.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecological Botany.
Addis Ababa University.
1997 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 17, no 5, 483-493 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A study was made of the vegetation in southern Wello (Ethiopia) in relation to human impact and the environment. 65 sample plots were laid out and analysed with respect to the cover value of vascular plant species. Altitude, slope, aspect and estimates of grazing pressure for each plot were also recorded along with physical and chemical soil properties analysed for samples taken from each plot. The following environmental factors, isolated by forward selection, show correlation with the axes of Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA): altitude, grazing, pH, K, Ca, Mg, slope and aspect.

Through hierarchical and non-hierarchical clustering methods the vegetation was divided into eight types, from which one was secondary forest characterised by patch dominance of Juniperus procera and Olea europaea ssp. cuspidata. These forest patches are found at high altitude sites and because of their inaccessibility are usually characterised by low livestock density and consequently low grazing pressure. The presence of large boulders and stones in Podocarpus falcatus forest decreases accessibility and creates natural protection for the trees. The other vegetation types, most of which are found at lower altitude and associated with varying intensities of grazing, include grasslands (grazed and protected), regenerating sites dominated by Euclea racemosa and Dodonaea angustifolia, dense and open shrublands and Olea europaea ssp. cuspidata woodlands. Human interference has a major impact on the vegetation of the study area and its recovery will depend on the degree of participation of the local people.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1997. Vol. 17, no 5, 483-493 p.
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecological Botany
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-199576DOI: 10.1111/j.1756-1051.1997.tb00345.xOAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-199576DiVA: diva2:620133
Available from: 2013-05-07 Created: 2013-05-07 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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