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Decomposing immigrant wage assimilation: the role of workplaces and occupations
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
2013 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This article uses a matched employer-employee panel data of the Swedish labor market to study immigrant wage assimilation, decomposing the wage catch-up into parts which can be attributed to relative wage growth within and between workplaces and occupations. This study shows that failing to control for selection into employment  when studying wage assimilation of immigrants is very likely to under-estimate wage catch-up. The results further show that both poorly and highly educated immigrants catch up through relative wage growth within workplaces and occupations, suggesting that employer-specic learning plays an important role for the wage catch-up. The highly educated suers from not beneting from occupational mobility as much as the natives do. This could be interpreted as a lack of access to the full range of occupations, possibly explained by di-culties in signaling specic skills

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: IFAU Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy , 2013. , 40 p.
, IFAU WORKING PAPER, ISSN 1651-1166 ; 2013:7
National Category
Social Sciences
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-200531OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-200531DiVA: diva2:624115
Available from: 2013-05-30 Created: 2013-05-30 Last updated: 2013-05-30Bibliographically approved

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Eliasson, Tove
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