uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Community health workers: a resource for identification and referral of sick newborns in rural Uganda
School of Public Health, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.
School of Public Health, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.
School of Public Health, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.
School of Public Health, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.
Show others and affiliations
2013 (English)In: Tropical medicine & international health, ISSN 1360-2276, E-ISSN 1365-3156, Vol. 18, no 7, 898-906 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To determine community health workers' (CHWs) competence in identifying and referring sick newborns in Uganda.

METHODS: Case-vignettes, observations of role-plays and interviews were employed to collect data using checklists and semistructured questionnaires, from 57 trained CHWs participating in a community health facility-linked cluster randomised trial. Competence to identify and refer sick newborns was measured by knowledge of newborn danger signs, skills to identify sick newborns and effective communication to mothers. Proportions and median scores were computed for each attribute with a pre-defined pass mark of 100% for knowledge and 90% for skill and communication.

RESULTS: For knowledge, 68% of the CHWs attained the pass mark. The median percentage score was 100 (IQR 94 100). 74% mentioned the required five newborn danger signs unprompted. 'Red umbilicus/cord with pus' was mentioned by all CHWs (100%), but none mentioned chest in-drawing and grunting as newborn danger signs. 63% attained the pass mark for both skill and communication. The median percentage scores were 91 (IQR 82 100) for skills and 94 (IQR 89, 94) for effective communication. 98% correctly identified the four case-vignettes as sick or not sick newborn. 'Preterm birth' was the least identified danger sign from the case-vignettes, by 51% of the CHWs.

CONCLUSION: CHWs trained for a short period but effectively supervised are competent in identifying and referring sick newborns in a poor resource setting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 18, no 7, 898-906 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-203742DOI: 10.1111/tmi.12106ISI: 000320335400014PubMedID: 23551394OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-203742DiVA: diva2:637501
Available from: 2013-07-18 Created: 2013-07-18 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Peterson, Stefan

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Peterson, Stefan
By organisation
International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH)
In the same journal
Tropical medicine & international health
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 353 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf