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Mesozoic fossil sustainability: synoptic case studies of resource management
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
2013 (English)In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 135, no 1, 131-143 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fossils are a non-renewable natural resource that is not only important to science but also has immense value for education, tourism and commercial trade. Although the importance of sustainably managing exceptionally rich fossil localities is widely acknowledged, it is not universal and irreplaceable scientific information and socioeconomic benefits are being lost. This study provides an overview of the economic, social and environmental factors affecting 10 contrasting fossil localities in Germany, China, Brazil, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and France that are significant for preserving the remains of Mesozoic vertebrates; these are amongst the most spectacular extinct animals and readily capture the public imagination. A discussion in the context of sustainable development is carried out. Non-extractive and scientific/educational (e.g. museums, geotourism) usage of fossil deposits are fully sustainable and benefit communities both economically and socially. Conversely, extractive uses (commercial collecting, quarrying) effect resource depletion but can be managed through scientific involvement, regulation and reinvestment of profits. Ultimately, implementation of an integrated approach embracing both profitable development and appropriate protection measures may ensure optimal usage of fossils for the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 135, no 1, 131-143 p.
Keyword [en]
Mesozoic vertebrate fossils, palaeontology, geoconservation, geotourism, education, sustainable exploitation
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-205402DOI: 10.1080/11035897.2013.776100ISI: 000321173200012OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-205402DiVA: diva2:642951
Available from: 2013-08-23 Created: 2013-08-16 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Budd, Graham E.Kear, Benjamin P.

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