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The gut of Guatemalan passalid beetles: A habitat colonized by cellobiose- and xylose-fermenting yeasts
Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.
Universidad del Valle de Guatemala.
Louisiana State University.
2013 (English)In: Fungal ecology, ISSN 1754-5048, E-ISSN 1878-0083, Vol. 6, no 5, 339-355 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The gut of insects is a productive environment for discovering undescribed species of yeasts, and the gut of wood-feeding insects of several families is especially rich in yeasts that carry out the fermentation of cellobiose and xylose. Passalid beetles (Passalidae, Coleoptera) live in dead wood that they ingest as their primary food source. We report the isolation, molecular identification and physiological characterization of 771 yeast cultures isolated from the gut of 16 species of passalids collected in nine localities in Guatemala. Ascomycete yeasts were present in the gut of every passalid studied, and the xylose-fermenting (X-F) yeasts Scheffersomyces shehatae and Scheffersomyces stipitis were the most abundant taxa isolated. The gut of the beetles also contained undescribed cellobiose-fermenting and X-F species in the Lodderomyces,Scheffersomyces and Spathaspora, and undescribed species in Sugiyamaella clades as well as rare yeast species in the Phaffomyces and Spencermartinsiella clades. Basidiomycete yeasts in the generaCryptococcus and Trichosporon were also common. The yeast species richness was influenced by the host species and the substrate, and gut-inhabiting yeasts have the ability to survive the differing physiological conditions of several gut compartments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 6, no 5, 339-355 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-206121DOI: 10.1016/j.funeco.2013.06.005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-206121DiVA: diva2:643580
Available from: 2013-08-27 Created: 2013-08-27 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full texthttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1754504813000743

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Urbina, Hector

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