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Cheating is the name of the game: Conventional cheating arguments fail to articulate moral responses to doping
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics. (Centre for Research Ethics & Bioethics)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics. (Centre for Research Ethics & Bioethics)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics. (Centre for Research Ethics & Bioethics)
2013 (English)In: Physical Culture and Sport. Studies and Research, ISSN 2081-2221, E-ISSN 1899-4849, Vol. 59, no 1, 21-32 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One of the most common arguments in the discussion on doping is that it represents a form of cheating. In this paper, it is argued that common doping-is-cheating arguments based on notions of rule-violation and unfair advantage are inadequate, since they treat cheating as distinct from the structure and the logic of competitive sport. An alternative approach to cheating in sport as regards performance enhancement will be offered based on the ethics of participation in interpersonal relationships. This participatory perspective points towards the need to broaden our conception of agency and moral responsibility in relation to doping, beyond the notion of the individual “drug-cheat” who acts in a vacuum.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 59, no 1, 21-32 p.
Keyword [en]
Doping, Cheating, unfair advantage, rule violation, interpersonal relationships
National Category
Ethics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-206601DOI: 10.2478/pcssr-2013-0020OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-206601DiVA: diva2:644701
Available from: 2013-09-02 Created: 2013-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Transforming the Doping Culture: Whose responsibility, what responsibility?
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transforming the Doping Culture: Whose responsibility, what responsibility?
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The doping culture represents an issue for sport and for society. Normative debates on doping have been mainly concerned with questions of the justifiability of doping. The practice of assigning responsibility for doping behaviour has chiefly been individual-based, focusing mainly on the individual athlete’s doping behaviour. The overarching aim of this thesis is to investigate the relevance and the importance of the ideas of responsibility in relation to ethical debates on doping. The more specific aim is to examine the possibility of broadening the scope of responsibility beyond the individual athlete, and to sketch a theoretical framework within which this expansion could be accommodated. In the first study, it is argued that bioethicists have a moral/professional responsibility to start out from a realistic and up-to-date view of genetics in ethical debates on gene doping, and that good bioethics requires good empirics. In study 2, the role played by affective processes in influencing athletes’ attitudes towards doping behaviour is investigated, both on an individual and on a collective level. It is concluded that an exclusive focus on individual-level rule violation and sanctions may entail overlooking the greater social picture and would prove to be ineffective in the long term. In study 3, the common doping-is-cheating arguments are examined and it is argued that they fail to capture vital features of people’s moral responses to doping behaviour. An alternative account of cheating in sport is presented in terms of failure to manifest good will and respect. It is concluded that putting cheating in the broader context of human interpersonal relationships makes evident the need to broaden the scope of moral responsibility and agency beyond the individual athlete. In study 4, the particular case of assigning responsibility for doping to sports physicians is used to examine the current individual-based approach to responsibility. This approach underestimates the scope of the responsibility by leaving out a range of other actors from the discourse of responsibility. The central conclusion of the thesis is that transforming the current doping culture requires broadening the scope of responsibility to include individuals and groups of individuals other than the athletes themselves.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2013. 72 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 931
Keyword
Doping, responsibility, prospective responsibilities, cheating, good will, interpersonal relations, sports
National Category
Ethics
Research subject
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-206607 (URN)978-91-554-8738-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2013-10-11, Auditorium Minus, Museum Gustavianum, Akademigatan 3, Uppsala, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2013-09-20 Created: 2013-09-02 Last updated: 2014-01-23

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Atry, AshkanHansson, Mats G.Kihlbom, Ulrik

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