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Habitat variation and wing coloration affect wing shape evolution in dragonflies
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Population and Conservation Biology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Population and Conservation Biology.
2013 (English)In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 26, no 9, 1866-1874 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Habitats are spatially and temporally variable, and organisms must be able to track these changes. One potential mechanism for this is dispersal by flight. Therefore, we would expect flying animals to show adaptations in wing shape related to habitat variation. In this work, we explored variation in wing shape in relation to preferred water body (flowing water or standing water with tolerance for temporary conditions) and landscape (forested to open) using 32 species of dragonflies of the genus Trithemis (80% of the known species). We included a potential source of variation linked to sexual selection: the extent of wing coloration on hindwings. We used geometric morphometric methods for studying wing shape. We also explored the phenotypic correlation of wing shape between the sexes. We found that wing shape showed a phylogenetic structure and therefore also ran phylogenetic independent contrasts. After correcting for the phylogenetic effects, we found (i) no significant effect of water body on wing shape; (ii) male forewings and female hindwings differed with regard to landscape, being progressively broader from forested to open habitats; (iii) hindwings showed a wider base in wings with more coloration, especially in males; and (iv) evidence for phenotypic correlation of wing shape between the sexes across species. Hence, our results suggest that natural and sexual selection are acting partially independently on fore- and hindwings and with differences between the sexes, despite evidence for phenotypic correlation of wing shape between males and females.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 26, no 9, 1866-1874 p.
Keyword [en]
geometric morphometrics, independent contrasts, landscape, phenotypic correlation, Trithemis, water body
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-207513DOI: 10.1111/jeb.12203ISI: 000323316800003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-207513DiVA: diva2:648796
Available from: 2013-09-17 Created: 2013-09-16 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Outomuro, DavidJohansson, Frank

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