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Work-related violence and its association with self-rated general health among public sector employees in Sweden
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. (Eva Vingård)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. (Eva Vingård)
2014 (English)In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 49, no 1, 163-171 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Work-related violence is one of the most serious threats to employee safety and health.

OBJECTIVE:

To ascertain the extent of self-reported violence or threats of violence at work in relation to the general health of public sector employees.

METHODS:

The study population comprised 9,611 female (83%) and male public employees in Sweden. A questionnaire based on items derived mainly from validated instruments was constructed to cover aspects such as health, lifestyle, and physical and psychosocial work conditions.

RESULTS:

One in three employees reported work-related violence, with the highest proportions among psychiatric nurses (79%) and psychiatric attendants (75%). Work-related violence more often affected those who were < 45 years old, worked < 40 hours/week, worked nights, or reported poor health. Regardless of gender, age, hours of work, night work, and type of occupation, exposure to work-related violence was associated with less than good general health, and this relationship was strongest for psychiatric nurses (OR=3.19; 95% CI=1.28-7.98), medical doctors/dentists (OR=2.46; 95% CI=1.35-4.49), compulsory school teachers (OR=2.14; 95% CI=1.33-3.45), and other nurses (OR=1.87; 95% CI=1.23-2.84).

CONCLUSIONS:

Work-related violence was frequently reported by employees in the most common public sector occupations, and it was associated withpoor health in both genders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 49, no 1, 163-171 p.
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-208593DOI: 10.3233/WOR-131715ISI: 000342237600017PubMedID: 24004771OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-208593DiVA: diva2:653612
Available from: 2013-10-04 Created: 2013-10-04 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Josephson, MalinVingård, Eva

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