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Psychomotor and cognitive deficits as predictors of 5-year outcome in first-episode schizophrenia
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
2014 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 68, no 4, 282-288 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Cognitive deficits are common in schizophrenia but the predictive value of these deficits for long-term outcome in first-episode patients is unclear. Aims: We aimed to investigate associations of performance in psychomotor and cognitive tests with a 5-year functional and symptomatic outcome. Methods: After clinical stabilization, patients with a first schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis (n = 46) were assessed for global cognitive function [Synonyms, Reasoning, and Block Design (SRB)], psychomotor speed [Trail Making Test (TMT) and finger tapping] and verbal learning (Claeson-Dahl Verbal Learning Test). The subsequent 5-year outcome regarding independent living, occupational and social function, and symptomatic remission status was assessed. Results: Low psychomotor speed was associated with poor social function 5 years later, with an odds ratio (OR) of 3.37 and a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.08-10.51, adjusted for antipsychotic drug use. Better performance on finger tapping with the non-dominant hand was associated with an increased risk of a 5-year symptomatic non-remission (adjusted OR = 0.42, CI 0.19-0.96). Occupational function and independent living were not significantly associated with any of the investigated tests. Conclusions: Psychomotor speed is associated with a long-term outcome regarding social function and symptom remission in patients with first-episode schizophrenia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 68, no 4, 282-288 p.
National Category
Psychiatry Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-209406DOI: 10.3109/08039488.2013.830771ISI: 000335003100010PubMedID: 24050122OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-209406DiVA: diva2:657287
Available from: 2013-10-18 Created: 2013-10-18 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Bodén, Robert

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