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Snap-to-fit, a Haptic 6 DOF Alignment Tool for Virtual Assembly
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
2013 (English)In: Proc. World Haptics (WHC), 2013 IEEE, 2013, 205-210 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Virtual assembly of complex objects has application in domains ranging from surgery planning to archaeology. In these domains the objective is to plan the restoration of skeletal anatomy or archaeological artifacts to achieve an optimal reconstruction without causing further damage. While graphical modeling plays a central role in virtual assembly, visual feedback alone is often insufficient since object contact and penetration is difficult to discern due to occlusion. Haptics can improve an assembly task by giving feedback when objects collide, but precise fitting of fractured objects guided by delicate haptic cues similar to those present in the physical world requires haptic display transparency beyond the performance of today’s systems. We propose a haptic alignment tool that combines a 6 Degrees of Freedom (DOF) attraction force with traditional 6 DOF contact forces to pull a virtual object towards a local stable fit with a fixed object. The object forces are integrated into a virtual coupling framework yielding a stable haptic tool. We demonstrate the use of our system on applications from both cranio-maxillofacial surgery and archaeology, and show that we can achieve haptic rates for fractured surfaces with over 5000 points.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. 205-210 p.
Keyword [en]
Virtual Assembly, Force Feedback, Haptic Rendering, Fractured Object, Virtual Environments, 3D puzzle
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Interaction Technologies Medical Image Processing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-209551DOI: 10.1109/WHC.2013.6548409ISI: 000325187400035ISBN: 978-1-4799-0087-9 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-209551DiVA: diva2:658408
Conference
IEEE World Haptics Conference (WHC), 14-18 April, 2013, Daejeon, SOUTH KOREA
Available from: 2013-10-21 Created: 2013-10-21 Last updated: 2015-09-25Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Haptics with Applications to Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery Planning
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Haptics with Applications to Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery Planning
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Virtual surgery planning systems have demonstrated great potential to help surgeons achieve a better functional and aesthetic outcome for the patient, and at the same time reduce time in the operating room resulting in considerable cost savings. However, the two-dimensional tools employed in these systems today, such as a mouse and a conventional graphical display, are difficult to use for interaction with three-dimensional anatomical images. Therefore surgeons often outsource virtual planning which increases cost and lead time to surgery.

Haptics relates to the sense of touch and haptic technology encompasses algorithms, software, and hardware designed to engage the sense of touch. To demonstrate how haptic technology in combination with stereo visualization can make cranio-maxillofacial surgery planning more efficient and easier to use, we describe our haptics-assisted surgery planning (HASP) system. HASP supports in-house virtual planning of reconstructions in complex trauma cases, and reconstructions with a fibula osteocutaneous free flap including bone, vessels, and soft-tissue in oncology cases. An integrated stable six degrees-of-freedom haptic attraction force model, snap-to-fit, supports semi-automatic alignment of virtual bone fragments in trauma cases. HASP has potential beyond this thesis as a teaching tool and also as a development platform for future research.

In addition to HASP, we describe a surgical bone saw simulator with a novel hybrid haptic interface that combines kinesthetic and vibrotactile feedback to display both low frequency contact forces and realistic high frequency vibrations when a virtual saw blade comes in contact with a virtual bone model. 

We also show that visuo-haptic co-location shortens the completion time, but does not improve the accuracy, in interaction tasks performed on two different visuo-haptic displays: one based on a holographic optical element and one based on a half-transparent mirror. 

Finally, we describe two prototype hand-worn haptic interfaces that potentially may expand the interaction capabilities of the HASP system. In particular we evaluate two different types of piezo-electric motors, one walking quasi-static motor and one traveling-wave ultrasonic motor for actuating the interfaces.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2015. 79 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 1289
Keyword
medical image processing, haptics, haptic rendering, haptic gripper, visuo-haptic co-location, vibrotactile feedback, surgery simulation, virtual surgery planning, cranio-maxillofacial surgery
National Category
Medical Image Processing Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Computerized Image Processing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-262378 (URN)978-91-554-9339-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-10-16, Room 2247, Polacksbacken, Lägerhyddsvägen 2, Uppsala, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2015-09-25 Created: 2015-09-14 Last updated: 2015-10-01Bibliographically approved

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Olsson, PontusNysjö, FredrikHirsch, Jan-MichaélCarlbom, Ingrid B.

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Human Computer InteractionInteraction TechnologiesMedical Image Processing

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