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Influence of lean and fat mass on bone mineral density and on urinary stone risk factors in healthy women
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Translational Medicine, ISSN 1479-5876, E-ISSN 1479-5876, Vol. 11, 248- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The role of body composition (lean mass and fat mass) on urine chemistries and bone quality is still debated. Our aim was therefore to determine the effect of lean mass and fat mass on urine composition and bone mineral density (BMD) in a cohort of healthy females. Materials and methods: 78 female volunteers (mean age 46 +/- 6 years) were enrolled at the Stone Clinic of Parma University Hospital and subdued to 24-hour urine collection for lithogenic risk profile, DEXA, and 3-day dietary diary. We defined two mathematical indexes derived from body composition measurement (index of lean mass-ILM, and index of fat mass-IFM) and the cohort was split using the median value of each index, obtaining groups differing only for lean or fat mass. We then analyzed differences in urine composition, dietary intakes and BMD. Results: The women with high values of ILM had significantly higher excretion of creatinine (991 +/- 194 vs 1138 +/- 191 mg/day, p = 0.001), potassium (47 +/-+/- 13 vs 60 +/- 18 mEq/day, p < 0.001), phosphorus (520 +/- 174 vs 665 +/- 186 mg/day, p < 0.001), magnesium (66 +/- 20 vs 85 +/- 26 mg/day, p < 0.001), citrate (620 +/- 178 vs 807 +/- 323 mg/day, p = 0.002) and oxalate (21 +/- 7 vs 27 +/- 11 mg/day, p = 0.015) and a significantly better BMD values in limbs than other women with low values of ILM. The women with high values of IFM had similar urine composition to other women with low values of IFM, but significantly better BMD in axial sites. No differences in dietary habits were found in both analyses. Conclusions: Lean mass seems to significantly influence urine composition both in terms of lithogenesis promoters and inhibitors, while fat mass does not. Lean mass influences bone quality only in limb skeleton, while fat mass influences bone quality only in axial sites.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 11, 248- p.
Keyword [en]
Body composition, Lean mass, Fat mass, Bone mineral density, Urinary lithogenic risk factors
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-211801DOI: 10.1186/1479-5876-11-248ISI: 000326453800001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-211801DiVA: diva2:668655
Available from: 2013-12-02 Created: 2013-12-02 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Baroni, Paolo

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