uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The scientific home in transit: Circulating a gendered family life in early twentieth-century physics and chemistry
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The argument of this paper is that laboratory-based physics and chemistry in the early twentieth century was deeply connected to the circulation of a particular form of gendered family life. The paper will present how domestic sites facilitated the intermingling of scientific and family life in the international community of scholars. The empirical example is the Swedish physical chemist Svante Arrhenius and his wife Maja Johansson. They married in 1905 and subsequently created a scientific household at the Nobel Institute for Physical Chemistry in Stockholm. Repeatedly, they visited similar scientific sites abroad and the paper aims to display how scholars transferred a culturally intelligible way of family life. Frequent travelling migrated a gendered lifestyle throughout the international community. Everywhere, husbands and wives were expected to perform distinct duties and repeatedly, scholars discussed the fate of their children.

The paper argues that the circulation of a gendered way of life was not external to knowledge making, but foundational to laboratory practices. A legitimate and culturally intelligible lifestyle produced trust, support and kinship needed for collaboration. So far, this dimension of knowledge in transit has not been addressed in the history of science, albeit processes of migration have been a repeated topic of concern in the field. Finally, the paper also suggests some major shifts in science and family life as Sweden was modernized in the 20th century. These transformations will be indicated by a short description of the fate of the children to the Arrhenius couple. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013.
National Category
Humanities
Research subject
History of Sciences and Ideas
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-212077OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-212077DiVA: diva2:676018
Conference
24th International Congress for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, Manchester
Available from: 2013-12-05 Created: 2013-12-05 Last updated: 2013-12-05

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

By organisation
Department of History of Science and Ideas
Humanities

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 633 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf