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Epidemiology of Unintentional Injuries Among Children Under Six Years Old in Floating and Residential Population in Four Communities in Beijing: A Comparative Study
National Center for Women and Children’s Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
National Center for Women and Children’s Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
National Center for Women and Children’s Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
Beijing Chaoyang Maternal and Child Health Care Center, Chaoyang District, Panjiayuan, Beijing, China.
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2014 (English)In: Maternal and Child Health Journal, ISSN 1092-7875, E-ISSN 1573-6628, Vol. 18, no 4, 911-919 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To explore and compare the epidemiological characteristics of non-fatal unintentional injury among children in floating and residential population. Using a structured survey, quantitative data were collected on a total of 352 floating and 201 residential families. Some potential influencing factors were questioned, such as socio-demographic characteristics, injury-related family environment, knowledge, attitude and behavior, and child's character. The self-reported incidence of non-fatal unintentional injuries was 11.9 % in the floating group and 12.9 % in the residential group. Unintentional injuries were more serious and caused more disease burden in floating children than residential children, with the average medical cost being over ten times in the floating group than in the residential group. Results of multiple regression analysis showed that children living in floating families have more risk of unintentional injuries than those children in residential families. Older children and children with extroverted character were more vulnerable to unintentional injuries. Risky family environment was also an important risk factor of unintentional injuries. Better household economic status and having more siblings appeared to reduce the probability of unintentional injuries among children. Floating children are more vulnerable to unintentional injuries comparing with residential children. These findings can be used as preliminary data supporting intervention strategies and activities to promote safe living environment and decrease injury incidence among floating children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 18, no 4, 911-919 p.
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Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-214969DOI: 10.1007/s10995-013-1318-6ISI: 000336735200017PubMedID: 23793489OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-214969DiVA: diva2:685819
Available from: 2014-01-09 Created: 2014-01-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Kaime-Atterhög, Wanjiku

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