uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Comparison of breastfeeding in rural areas of Sweden and Australia - a cohort study
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Stockholm, Sweden.
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Stockholm, Sweden.
University of Melbourne, School of Rural Health, Shepparton, Victoria, Australia.
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Stockholm, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2013 (English)In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 26, no 4, 229-234 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Breastfeeding rates in Sweden and Australia appears to be decreasing in both countries. National statistics shows that 87% of infants in Sweden and 73% in Australia receive any breastfeeding two months of age.

AIM: To compare women's experiences of breastfeeding in Sweden and Australia and to identify factors associated with breastfeeding two months after birth.

METHODS: A cohort study in two rural hospitals in mid Sweden (n=300) and north-eastern Victoria in Australia (n=91) during 2007-2009. Participants responded to questionnaires in mid pregnancy and two months after birth. Crude and adjusted odds ratios with a 95% confidence interval were used to detect differences between women in both cohorts.

FINDINGS: Women in Sweden (88.3%) were more likely to report any breastfeeding of the baby two months after birth (OR 2.41; 95% CI: 1.33-4.38) compared to women in Australia (75.8%) but were less satisfied with breastfeeding support and information. The most important factor associated with breastfeeding at two months postpartum for the Swedish women was to have received sufficient information about breastfeeding on the postnatal ward (OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.41-4.76) while for the Australian women receiving the best possible help when breastfeeding for the first time was most important (OR 4.3; 95% CI 1.50-12.46).

CONCLUSION: The results indicate that Swedish women were more likely than their Australian counterparts to breastfeed the baby two months after birth. The findings demonstrated the importance of sufficient information and help when breastfeeding is initiated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 26, no 4, 229-234 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-215024DOI: 10.1016/j.wombi.2013.08.159ISI: 000327774500008PubMedID: 24053907OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-215024DiVA: diva2:685887
Available from: 2014-01-10 Created: 2014-01-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Hildingsson, Ingegerd

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hildingsson, Ingegerd
By organisation
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
In the same journal
Women and Birth
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 424 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf