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Phylogeography and subspecies status of Black Grouse
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Population and Conservation Biology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Population and Conservation Biology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Population and Conservation Biology.
2014 (English)In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 155, no 1, 13-25 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The cold periods of the Pleistocene have had a striking impact on the diversification of most organisms in temperate regions. Phylogeographic patterns and postglacial expansion are poorly understood in the Black Grouse (Tetrao tetrix). This species is widely distributed across Eurasia, and has been divided into a number of subspecies on the basis of morphological differences and geographic isolation. To investigate the evolutionary history of the species, 143 samples from different regions were examined for a mtDNA control region fragment. Overall, analyses of mtDNA gave support for the divergence between Tetrao tetrix tetrix, T. t. ussuriensis and T. t. mongolicus. The analyses reveal the effects of colonisation out of glacial refugia on the genetic diversity and genetic structure of Black Grouse. The phylogeographical results are consistent with a demographic population expansion following a bell-shaped mismatch distribution, a star-shaped phylogeny and low nucleotide diversity. Patterns of postglacial dispersal imply that Black Grouse from southern Europe have been restricted to this area, and did not contribute to the genetic diversity of northern Europe. Instead, Black Grouse spread out to northern Europe from a refugium in the east and a possible one in western Europe, following the retreat of glacial ice sheets, although both refugia remain unidentified. We suggest that T. t. britannicus and T. t. viridanus correspond to northern T. t. tetrix, and that this lineage has diverged from the other subspecies. This division is tentative due to limited sampling, but it will facilitate the management of different evolutionary significant units of the species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 155, no 1, 13-25 p.
Keyword [en]
Control region, Demographic expansion, Phylogeography, Postglacial colonisation, Refugia, Subspecies
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-217619DOI: 10.1007/s10336-013-0982-zISI: 000329248600002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-217619DiVA: diva2:694318
Available from: 2014-02-06 Created: 2014-02-04 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Hoglund, Jacob

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