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Is Social Support Equally Important for Both Directly and Indirectly Affected Disaster Victims?
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, National Center for Disaster Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2011 (English)In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology: Volume 2 Supplement 1, 2011, 72-72 p.Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There has been much research on social support and its association with both general mental and physical health, and social support is an important salutogenic factor after traumatic events. Still, the magnitude of the effect of social support on posttraumatic stress (PTS) is not fully understood. In particular, the importance of social support after disasters may be contingent on exposure severity. In a survey of Swedish tourists 14 months after the tsunami in Southeast Asia (N4910), in which the survivors were exposed to few post-disaster adversities, detailed information on exposure severity allowed for an examination of the effect of the interaction between social support and exposure severity on PTS. Social support was assessed by the Crisis Support Scale and PTS by the Impact of Event Scale-Revised. Preliminary analyses will be presented, and the size and significance of the effect will be discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. 72-72 p.
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-219771OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-219771DiVA: diva2:703110
Conference
12th European Conference on Traumatic Stress, Vienna, June 2-5, 2011
Available from: 2014-03-05 Created: 2014-03-05 Last updated: 2014-03-05

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Arnberg, Filip KBergh Johannesson, Kerstin

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National Center for Disaster PsychiatryPsychiatry, University HospitalDepartment of Psychology
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