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Monitoring Human Babesiosis Emergence through Vector Surveillance, New England, USA
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Biology Education Centre.
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2014 (English)In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 20, no 2, 225-231 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human babesiosis is an emerging tick-borne disease caused by the intraerythrocytic protozoan Babesia microti. Its geographic distribution is more limited than that of Lyme disease, despite sharing the same tick vector and reservoir hosts. The geographic range of B. microti is expanding, but knowledge of its range is incomplete and relies exclusively on reports of human cases. We evaluated the utility of tick-based surveillance for monitoring disease expansion by comparing the ratios of the 2 infections in humans and ticks in areas with varying babesiosis endemicity. We found a close association between human disease and tick infection ratios in long-established babesiosis-endemic areas but a lower than expected incidence of human babesiosis on the basis of tick infection rates in new disease-endemic areas. This finding suggests that babesiosis at emerging sites is underreported. Vector-based surveillance can provide an early warning system for the emergence of human babesiosis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 20, no 2, 225-231 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-220796DOI: 10.3201/eid2002.130644ISI: 000330553800007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-220796DiVA: diva2:706755
Available from: 2014-03-21 Created: 2014-03-20 Last updated: 2014-03-21Bibliographically approved

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