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Thiamin Function, Metabolism, Uptake, and Transport
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Fjordforsk AS, N-6896 Fresvik, Norway.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology. Zhejiang Univ, Dept Chem, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang, Peoples R China.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational and Systems Biology.
2014 (English)In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 53, no 5, 821-835 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vitamins are crucial components in the diet of animals and many other living organisms. One of these essential nutrients, thiamin, is known to be involved in several cell functions, including energy metabolism and the degradation of sugars and carbon skeletons. Other roles that are connected to this vitamin are neuronal communication, immune system activation, signaling and maintenance processes in cells and tissues, and cell-membrane dynamics. Because of the key functions of thiamin, uptake and transport through the body are crucial. Its uptake route is relatively complex, encompassing a variety of protein families, including the solute carrier anion transporters, the alkaline phosphatase transport system, and the human extraneuronal monoamine transporter family, some of which are multispecific proteins. There are two known structures of protein (subunits) involved in thiamin uptake in prokaryotes. Binding of thiamin to these proteins is strongly guided by electrostatic interactions. The lack of structural information about thiamin binding proteins for higher organisms remains a bottleneck for understanding the uptake process of thiamin in atomic detail. This review includes recent data on thiamin metabolism, related deficiencies and pathologies, and the latest findings on thiamin binding transporters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 53, no 5, 821-835 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-220986DOI: 10.1021/bi401618yISI: 000331342700003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-220986DiVA: diva2:707685
Available from: 2014-03-25 Created: 2014-03-24 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Manzetti, SergioZhang, Jinvan der Spoel, David

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