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Financial stress in late adulthood and diverse risks of incident cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in women and men
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
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2014 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, 17- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Financial stress may have adverse health effects. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether having a cash margin and living alone or cohabiting is associated with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality. Methods: Representative population-based prospective cohort study of 60-year-old women (n = 2065) and men (n = 1939) in Stockholm County, Sweden. National registers were used to identify cases of incident CVD (n = 375) and all-cause mortality (n = 385). The presence of a cash margin was determined in the questionnaire with the following question: Would you, if an unexpected situation occurred, be able to raise 10 000 SEK within a week? (This was equivalent to US$ 1250 in 1998). Results: Compared with cohabiting women with a cash margin, the risk of all-cause mortality was higher among cohabiting women without a cash margin, with hazard ratios (HRs) of 1.97 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-3.66). Using cohabiting men with cash margin as referent, single men without a cash margin were at an increased risk of both incident CVD and all-cause mortality: HR 2.84 (95% CI 1.61-4.99) and 2.78 (95% CI 1.69-4.56), respectively. Single men with cash margins still had an increased risk of all-cause mortality when compared with cohabiting men with a cash margin: HR 1.67 (95% CI 1.22-2.28). Conclusions: Financial stress may increase the risks of incident CVD and all-cause mortality, especially among men. Furthermore these risks are likely to be greater in men living in single households and in women without cash margins. Living with a partner seems to protect men, but not women, from ill-health associated with financial stress due to the lack of a cash margin.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 14, 17- p.
Keyword [en]
Cash margin, Financial stress, Cohort study, All-cause mortality, Cardiovascular disease
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-222950DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-14-17ISI: 000332708000001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-222950DiVA: diva2:712551
Available from: 2014-04-15 Created: 2014-04-15 Last updated: 2014-04-15Bibliographically approved

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Carlsson, Axel C.
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Molecular epidemiologyScience for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab
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