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Labour Market Organisations’ Participation in Swedish Public Policy-Making
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
2002 (English)In: Scandinavian Political Studies, ISSN 0080-6757, E-ISSN 1467-9477, Vol. 25, no 4, 295-315 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Unions and employers are political actors. Apart from defending their interests on the labour market they act in the political arena. In order to weaken the trade unions neo-liberal parties and employers’ organisations have tried to change existing systems in Sweden and elsewhere. Hence, the general questions being asked in this article are: Do Swedish labour market organisations still participate in (i.e. try to influence) public policy-making on a large-scale? Are there any substantial differences in the degree to which unions and employers’ organisations participate or in their access and strategies of participation? In this article it is argued that while participation of labour market organisations in the old institutionalised framework has decreased, it has not vanished. Labour market organisations are also very much involved in public policy-making by informally contacting politicians and public servants. The unions have extensive contacts with politicians on all levels, but especially with the Social Democratic Party, while employers’ organisations have more intense contacts with the public administration and public servants. The over-all picture being presented in this article is that labour market organisations in Sweden have not at all been left out in the cold. It is clear that Sweden is far from a British situation and still remains similar to its Scandinavian neighbours.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Blackwell , 2002. Vol. 25, no 4, 295-315 p.
Keyword [en]
Corporatism, Labour Market, Lobbying, Interest Groups
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalization Studies)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-44390DOI: 10.1111/1467-9477.00073OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-44390DiVA: diva2:72295
Available from: 2006-11-16 Created: 2006-11-16 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Svensson, TorstenÖberg, PerOla

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