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Amyloid-beta-directed immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
2014 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 275, no 3, 284-295 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Current treatment options for Alzheimer's disease (AD) are limited to medications that reduce dementia symptoms. Given the rapidly ageing populations in most areas of the world, new therapeutic interventions for AD are urgently needed. In recent years, a number of drug candidates targeting the amyloid-ss (A ss) peptide have advanced into clinical trials; however, most have failed because of safety issues or lack of efficacy. The A ss peptide is central to the pathogenesis, and immunotherapy against A ss has attracted considerable interest. It offers the possibility to reach the target with highly specific drugs. Active immunization and passive immunization have been the most widely studied approaches to immunotherapy of AD. A favourable aspect of active immunization is the capacity for a small number of vaccinations to generate a prolonged antibody response. A potential disadvantage is the variability in the antibody response across patients. The potential advantages of passive immunotherapy include the reproducible delivery of a known amount of therapeutic antibodies to the patient and rapid clearance of those antibodies if side effects develop. A disadvantage is the requirement for repeated infusions of antibodies over time. After more than a decade of research, anti-amyloid immunotherapy remains one of the most promising emerging strategies for developing disease-modifying treatments for AD. In this review, we examine the presently ongoing A ss-directed immunotherapies that have passed clinical development Phase IIa.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 275, no 3, 284-295 p.
Keyword [en]
Alzheimer's disease, amyloid-beta, clinical trials, immunotherapy
National Category
Geriatrics Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-227917DOI: 10.1111/joim.12168ISI: 000332446200006OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-227917DiVA: diva2:731553
Available from: 2014-07-01 Created: 2014-07-01 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Lannfelt, Lars

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