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Blood Pressure Load Does Not Add to Ambulatory Blood Pressure Level for Cardiovascular Risk Stratification
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2014 (English)In: Hypertension, ISSN 0194-911X, E-ISSN 1524-4563, Vol. 63, no 5, 925-933 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Experts proposed blood pressure (BP) load derived from 24-hour ambulatory BP recordings as a more accurate predictor of outcome than level, in particular in normotensive people. We analyzed 8711 subjects (mean age, 54.8 years; 47.0% women) randomly recruited from 10 populations. We expressed BP load as percentage (%) of systolic/diastolic readings 135/85 mm Hg and 120/70 mm Hg during day and night, respectively, or as the area under the BP curve (mm Hgxh) using the same ceiling values. During a period of 10.7 years (median), 1284 participants died and 1109 experienced a fatal or nonfatal cardiovascular end point. In multivariable-adjusted models, the risk of cardiovascular complications gradually increased across deciles of BP level and load (P<0.001), but BP load did not substantially refine risk prediction based on 24-hour systolic or diastolic BP level (generalized R-2 statistic 0.294%; net reclassification improvement 0.28%; integrated discrimination improvement 0.001%). Systolic/diastolic BP load of 40.0/42.3% or 91.8/73.6 mm Hgxh conferred a 10-year risk of a composite cardiovascular end point similar to a 24-hour systolic/diastolic BP of 130/80 mm Hg. In analyses dichotomized according to these thresholds, increased BP load did not refine risk prediction in the whole study population (R(2)0.051) or in untreated participants with 24-hour ambulatory normotension (R(2)0.034). In conclusion, BP load does not improve risk stratification based on 24-hour BP level. This also applies to subjects with normal 24-hour BP for whom BP load was proposed to be particularly useful in risk stratification.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 63, no 5, 925-933 p.
Keyword [en]
ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, epidemiology, risk factors
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-227870DOI: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.113.02780ISI: 000334320900020OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-227870DiVA: diva2:731815
Available from: 2014-07-02 Created: 2014-07-01 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Lind, Lars

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